Lidar Shines in Northern Nevada

by Jay Johnson (ArcUser, Spring 2019, pages 54–57)

A message from Rich Koehler, NBMG: The lidar data set NBMG was instrumental in acquiring through the USGS 3DEP program is featured in an article in ArcUser magazine.  It highlights how our local municipality is using the data and encourages other cities to get involved with the 3DEP program.

Read the entire article here:
https://www.esri.com/about/newsroom/arcuser/lidarshines/
https://www.esri.com/content/dam/esrisites/en-us/newsroom/arcuser/G432829_AU-spring-168364_WEB.pdf

Excerpts from article: “Turning a terabyte (TB) of lidar data into ready-to-use GIS products can be quite challenging.  In this article, I share the strategies I used to transform lidar data into GIS products to benefit Washoe County, Nevada.”

“In 2017, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP), in cooperation with the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG) and local cooperators, flew a lidar mission to collect quality level 1 (QL1) and quality level 2 (QL2) LAS data across more than 1,500 square miles covering Reno, Sparks, Carson City, and surrounding areas in northern Nevada. Local cooperators included the Washoe County Regional Basemap Committee (Washoe County, City of Reno, City of Sparks, and NV Energy), US Forest Service, Lyon County, and Storey County.

Here are a few articles sent in previous NBMG emails that explain the background of the lidar acquisition project and data that is now publicly available.

Researchers made 3D laser maps of northern Nevada and the data is available to anyone online

Reno Gazette Journal, 12/21/18, by Benjamin Spillman
https://www.rgj.com/story/life/outdoors/2018/12/21/laser-data-creates-most-detailed-maps-ever-reno-carson/2387823002/
This story includes a video interview: “Researcher Seth Dee of University of Nevada explains how recently made LiDAR maps of Reno and Carson City will help Nevadans for years to come.


Revealing our dynamic landscape through new high-resolution topographic data: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology’s regional-scale lidar mapping provides novel insights into earthquake, flood and glacial history
Nevada Today, 12/18/2018, by: Jane Tors
https://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2018/nbmg-lidar-mapping-project


Below the Neon: Reno’s Bare Earth
Recent RenoSparksCarson City Lidar Acquisition Project
Story maps provide an excellent means for NBMG staff to share information about programs and activities throughout Nevada with the public. NBMG Cartography and GIS group members Irene Seelye and Rachel Micander have created a story map documenting the recent lidar acquisition in the greater Reno–Sparks–Carson City area. This story map, titled “Reno’s Bare Earth: Below the Neon,” documents the differences between various quality levels of lidar data, air photos, and the bare earth data that are obtained with lidar. This recent lidar acquisition was made possible with matching funds from the Office of the Vice President of Research and Innovation at the University of Nevada, Reno and through partnerships with the Washoe Regional Basemap Committee, the US Forest Service, Lyon County, and Storey County.

Read more about the plan, collaborators, and the final products here: https://nbmg.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=d56cc0a4bb4c425093f63cb43550e720

Preliminary geologic map of the Mount Rose NW quadrangle, Washoe County, Nevada


Authors:
Nicholas H. Hinz, Alan R. Ramelli, and Christopher D. Henry
Year:
2018
Series:
Open-File Report 2018-03
Version:
supersedes Open-File Report 2016-06
Format: plate: 35 x 29 inches, color; text: 4 pages, B/W
Scale:
1:24,000
View/download/purchase:

http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Prel-geol-Mount-Rose-NW-p/of2018-03.htm

This quadrangle straddles the north end of the Carson Range directly west-southwest of Reno and abuts the Nevada-California border. The Truckee River and Interstate 80 transect the northwest quarter of the quadrangle. Parts of the City of Reno urban area and Steamboat irrigation ditch fall within the northern part of the quadrangle, and part of a rural community along Thomas Creek is in the southeast quarter.

The bedrock exposures in the quadrangle consist of Mesozoic granitic and metamorphic basement, and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The Tertiary section includes a complex section of lavas, intrusions, and volcanic sedimentary rocks. Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the northern part of the quadrangle are part of an ~1112 Ma ancestral Cascades volcanic center. Generally north-dipping Miocene basalt (~10 Ma) and fluvial-lacustrine sediments rest on the ~11–12 Ma volcanic rocks. Many of the volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the southern part of the quadrangle were derived from a ~6–7 Ma volcanic center in the Mount Rose quadrangle, directly south of this quadrangle. Plio-Pleistocene basaltic andesite lavas locally rest on these late Miocene volcanic rocks in the middle part of the quadrangle. Principal surficial deposits include late Pliocene to modern alluvial fan and fluvial deposits, deposits of the Truckee River, Quaternary glacial deposits, and extensive late Quaternary mass wasting deposits. Notable deep-seated landslide complexes reside in all major drainages—including Thomas Creek, Hunter Creek, Bronco Creek, and the smaller catchments along the west edge of the quadrangle. Most of the Carson Range is west-tilted with west-dipping Cenozoic strata. However, within the Mount Rose NW quadrangle, the dip domain flips and most all the Cenozoic strata dips east with numerous west-dipping normal faults. These west-dipping normal faults are cut by younger east-dipping normal faults of the Mount Rose fault zone on the east side of the range. East-facing Quaternary fault scarps occur on the east side of the range, west-facing Quaternary fault scarps occur on the west side of the range, and the crest of the range is cut by a complex zone of mostly west-facing faults.

This geologic map was funded in part by the USGS National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program under STATEMAP award numbers G15AC00240, 2016, and G17AC00212, 2018.

New Geologic Maps in Northern Nevada: Mount Rose NW and Herder Creek Quadrangles

 

mrnw

Preliminary Geologic Map of the South Half of the Mount Rose NW Quadrangle, Washoe County, Nevada

 Authors: Nicholas H. Hinz and Alan R. Ramelli
Year: 2016
Series: Open-File Report 16-6
Format: plate: 35 x 29 inches, color; text: 3 pages, b/w
Scale: 1:24,000
View/Download/Buy: http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Geol-south-half-Mount-Rose-NW-p/of2016-06.htm

This quadrangle straddles the north end of the Carson Range directly west-southwest of Reno and abuts the Nevada-California border. The Truckee River and Interstate 80 transect the northwest quarter of this quadrangle. This quadrangle also encompasses part of the rural community along Thomas Creek in the southeast quarter, and segments of the Steamboat irrigation ditch and part of the City of Reno urban area fall within the northeast corner.

The bedrock exposures in the quadrangle consist of Mesozoic granitic basement and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The Tertiary section includes a complex section of lavas, intrusions, and volcanic sedimentary rocks. Many of these volcanic and sedimentary rocks were derived from a ~6-7 Ma ancestral Cascades volcanic center in the Mount Rose quadrangle, directly south of this quadrangle. Plio-Pleistocene basaltic andesite lavas and rhyolite domes locally rest on the late Miocene volcanic rocks in the middle part of the quadrangle. Principal surficial deposits include late Pliocene to modern alluvial fan and fluvial deposits, Quaternary glacial deposits, and late Quaternary mass wasting deposits. Notable deep-seated landslide complexes reside in all major drainages—including Thomas Creek, Hunter Creek, Bronco Creek, and the smaller catchments along the west edge of the quadrangle. Most of the Carson Range is west-tilted with west-dipping Cenozoic strata. However, within the Mount Rose NW quadrangle, the dip domain flips and most all the Cenozoic strata dips east with numerous west-dipping normal faults. These west-dipping normal faults are cut by younger east-dipping normal faults of the Mount Rose fault zone on the east side of the range.  East-facing Quaternary fault scarps were observed on the east side of the range and west-facing Quaternary fault scarps were observed on the west side of the range.

This geologic map was funded in part by the USGS National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program under STATEMAP award number G15AC00240, 2016.

 herdercreek

Preliminary Geologic Map of the Herder Creek Quadrangle, Elko County, Nevada
Author: Seth Dee and Michael W. Ressel
Year: 2016
Series: Open-File Report 16-5
Format: plate: 33 x 29 inches, color; text: 5 pages, b/w
Scale: 1:24,000
View/Download/Buy: http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Prel-geol-Herder-Creek-quad-p/of2016-05.htm

The map area covers part of Starr Valley, the upper reaches of the Humboldt River, and the northwest part of the East Humboldt Range.

The Ruby Mountains–East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex is exposed in the high-relief range front in the southeast part of the quadrangle. In this area, the core complex is comprised of intensely metamorphosed and highly attenuated Neoarchean through Mississippian(?) strata, thought to be part of the platform facies of the Proterozoic through Paleozoic passive margin. Contractional structures exposed in the map area are complex and difficult to discern due to overprinted extensional deformation but are likely part of the Winchell Lake nappe (WLN), a kilometer scale, southward-closing recumbent fold-nappe mapped in adjacent quadrangles to the east. Overturned Devonian to Neoproterozoic(?) meta-sedimentary strata exposed at the highest structural levels are interpreted to be in thrust contact with an underlying, upright sequence of Cambrian to Neoproterozoic(?) paragneiss and Paleoproterozoic to Neoarchean(?) orthogneiss in the core of the fold. This structural interpretation matches those from the adjacent Welcome quadrangle (McGrew and Snoke, 2015; NBMG Map 184). Rocks in the upper part of the metamorphic core complex are pervasively overprinted by a WNW-directed mylonitic shear fabric, which records middle to late Cenozoic extensional exhumation from mid-crustal depths. Abundant sills and lenses of less deformed Oligocene to Cretaceous garnet-muscovite leucogranite and biotite monzogranite intrude all metamorphic rocks in the quadrangle.

The west side of the East Humboldt Range is bound by the active, W-dipping Ruby Mountains frontal fault zone, which extends for more than 60 km to the southwest. A west step-over in the Ruby Mountains fault south of the Herder Creek drainage results in a broad, hanging wall uplift underlain by middle-Miocene to Pliocene strata comprised of NE-dipping to flat-lying tuffaceous sandstone, shale, and conglomerate of the Humboldt Formation and younger units. A tephra in the uppermost exposed section yielded a 40Ar/39Ar age on feldspar of 5.15 ± 1.82 Ma.

Repeated late Quaternary surface-rupturing earthquakes along active traces of the frontal fault are recorded by increased uplift and dissection of Quaternary surfaces as a function of relative age. Fault scarps in Holocene deposits have up to 2.5 m of vertical separation while glacial outwash deposits from the two most recent Pleistocene glacial advances have scarp heights ranging from 6 to 32 m. The upper reaches of several drainages have well-preserved glacial moraine deposits that record the Angel Lake and Lamoille glacial advances. Adjacent to the Humboldt River, in the northwest corner of the quadrangle, 3 sets of abandoned terrace surfaces are preserved, including a broad surface comprised of gravel-rich alluvium that was likely deposited during a period of increased discharge during the latest Pleistocene.

This geologic map was funded in part by the USGS National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program under STATEMAP award number G15AC00240, 2016.

Earth Science Week Field Trip—Oct 17 and 18—reminder!

Mt_Rose_Hinz_8_south_face_Mt_RoseRGB
Mount Rose, Washoe County, NV. Photographer: Nick Hinz

NBMG Earth Science Week Field Trip 2015:
Fire and Ice—Geology of the Mount Rose Quadrangle, Lake Tahoe, and the Carson Range
Saturday, October 17 or Sunday, October 18
(Sunday is a repeat of Saturday)

Sign up here for this year’s field trip!

This year’s Earth Science Week is October 11-17, 2015 and will celebrate the theme “Visualizing Earth’s Systems.”

NBMG participates in Earth Science Week by coordinating annual geologic field trips for the general public. The field trip is free to the public! Be sure to bring your own water, lunch, sunscreen, hat, first-aid kit, walking stick, gloves, camera, binoculars, bag or bucket for collecting samples, safety glasses if you use a hammer, and a GPS receiver (optional). The day’s activity will involve hiking and climbing around rocks so wear appropriate outdoor clothing and sturdy shoes or hiking boots.

Most of the stops will involve very short walks from the car.  The longest hike will be about two miles round trip along the Mt. Rose trail, beginning and ending at the Mount Rose Highway summit.

This year NBMG will lead a trip to look at recently completed mapping of the Mount Rose quadrangle which covers an area from north shore of Lake Tahoe to north Mount Rose proper, east into the Mount Rose Ski Area, and west to the NV/CA state line.  Our journey will have stops along the Mount Rose Highway (including Mount Rose summit), in Incline Village, and along the north shore of Lake Tahoe.  We will look at the history of volcanoes, glaciers, and faults that have built and continue to build the landscape we see today.

JUST POSTED! You can read the details of the trip in this guide:
http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/ScienceEducation/EarthScienceWeek/e057_text.pdf

The Mount Rose geologic map can be found here:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Prel-geol-Mount-Rose-quad-p/of2014-07.htm

You must sign up online[docs.google.com] prior to the trip and sign a waiver form. Please print out a paper copy, sign and date, and submit prior to the field trip or bring to the field trip starting point.

Field trip participants should meet at 9:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Galena Creek Visitor Center[galenacreekvisitorcenter.org] on the Mt. Rose Highway. Departure will be at 9:30 a.m.

There will be several geologists in attendance to help answer your questions about geology and identify a variety of rocks. There will also be an opportunity to learn more about geocaching and EarthCaching—a high-tech treasure hunting game using GPS devices. If you have a hand-held GPS unit, please bring it.

For questions about the field trip, please call Nick Hinz at 775-784-1446.

For more information about educational activities during Earth Science Week, go to the national Earth Science Week website[earthsciweek.org].

ESW Proclamation by the Governor

New Geologic Map: Mount Rose Quadrangle with shaded relief

Open-File Report 14-7
Preliminary geologic map of the Mount Rose quadrangle, Washoe County, Nevada

by Nicholas H. Hinz, Alan R. Ramelli, and James E. Faulds, 2014

of147

A 1:24,000-scale, preliminary geologic map of the Mount Rose 7.5-minute quadrangle in Washoe County, Nevada.  This quadrangle straddles the northern Carson Range directly north of Lake Tahoe and includes much of Incline Village, the Mount Rose Highway, three north Lake Tahoe ski areas, part of the Tahoe Rim Trail, Mount Rose proper, and numerous major tributary drainages to the Truckee River and Lake Tahoe. Mapping of this quadrangle has important implications for understanding earthquake and landslide hazards in the Reno–Carson City–Lake Tahoe region.

The bedrock exposures in the quadrangle consist of Mesozoic crystalline basement and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks.  The Mesozoic rocks are dominantly granitic with local metamorphic roof pendants.  The Tertiary section includes a complex section of lavas, intrusions, and volcanic sedimentary rocks.  Much of these volcanic and sedimentary rocks were derived from a Miocene ancestral Cascades volcanic center in the northwest quarter of this quadrangle.  Principle surficial deposits include late Pliocene to modern alluvial fan and fluvial deposits, Quaternary glacial deposits, and late Quaternary mass wasting deposits.  Notable deep-seated landslide complexes reside in the Whites Creek, Gray Creek, and First Creek drainages.  The Tertiary section is cut by a system of north-northwest to north-northeast-striking normal and dextral-normal faults with both down-to-west and down-to-east sense of displacement, kinematically linked with a system of northeast to east-northeast-striking sinistral-normal faults.  Detailed mapping of Quaternary fault scarps associated with the Incline Village fault zone benefited greatly from publicly available, high-resolution LiDAR data for the Tahoe basin.

This publication was prepared as part of the STATEMAP component of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey.

Open-File Report 14-7, scale 1:24,000, 39 x 28 inches, color; 4-page text, b/w; folded or rolled, $18.00       

Be sure and check out the new shaded relief format on this map of Mount Rose.

Available free on the Web or purchase here: http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/sales/pbsdtls.php?sku=OF14-%207

Three new geologic maps available

Map 180
Geologic Map of the Flowery Peak Quadrangle, Storey and Lyon Counties, Nevada
by Stephen B. Castor, P. Kyle House, Donald M. Hudson, and Christopher D. Henry
2013
 m180

The 1:24,000-scale geologic map of the Flowery Peak quadrangle is an extension of mapping published recently by the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology in the adjacent Virginia City quadrangle. The Flowery Peak quadrangle, southeast of Reno and east of Virginia City, includes part of the Comstock mining district, an important historic source of precious metals. More than 60 lithologic units were mapped in the Flowery Peak quadrangle. Twenty-six units are in the three major mid-Miocene intermediate magmatic groups defined in the Virginia City quadrangle. Extensive Quaternary sedimentary deposits include eighteen units exposed in the Carson River Plains in the southeast part of the Flowery Peak quadrangle. Minor amounts of mid-Miocene sedimentary rocks, early Miocene and Oligocene ash-flow tuffs, late Miocene basalt, and Quaternary rhyolitic rocks are present. Mesozoic metasedimentary and granitic rocks occur as well. Mapping of hydrothermal veins and associated alteration in the Flowery Peak quadrangle extends similar mapping in the Virginia City quadrangle. Twelve new 40Ar/39Ar ages determined for igneous rocks in the Flowery Peak quadrangle, along with chemical and mineralogic data, are reported in text that accompanies the map along with full unit descriptions.

This map was prepared as part of the STATEMAP component of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey.

This map supersedes Open-File Report 06-16.

Available on the Web:
Text:   http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/dox/m180_text.pdf

Plate:  http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/dox/m180.pdf

Map 180, one 35×31.5-inch color map with 3 cross sections, scale 1:24,000; 24-page text, b/w; folded or rolled, $23.00 or $16.00 (map only)

 

Open-File Report 13-10
Preliminary Geologic Map of the Central Lake Range, Southern Fox Range, and Northern Terraced Hills, Emerson Pass Geothermal Area, Washoe County, Nevada
by Ryan B. Anderson, James E. Faulds, and Gregory M. Dering
2013

of1310

Detailed geologic mapping and stratigraphic-structural analyses have elucidated the kinematics, stress state, and structural controls of a “blind” geothermal system in Emerson Pass on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Reservation, western Nevada.  The Emerson Pass area resides near the boundary of the Basin and Range and Walker Lane provinces of northwestern Nevada, at the northeast end of Pyramid Lake.  Strata of the surrounding Fox Range, Lake Range, and Terraced Hills are comprised of late Miocene to Pliocene sedimentary rocks and the middle Miocene Pyramid sequence volcanic rocks, all overlying Cretaceous intrusions and Triassic to Jurassic metasedimentary rocks.

The active geothermal system is expressed as a 2-m shallow temperature thermal anomaly (maximum ~60°C) that lies at the western edge of a broad left step at the northeast end of Pyramid Lake between the north- to north-northeast-striking, west-dipping, Fox and Lake Range normal faults.  The 2-m temperature surveys have defined a north-south elongate thermal anomaly that resides on a north- to north-northeast-striking normal fault.  Additionally, travertine mounds, chalcedonic silica veins, and silica-cemented Pleistocene lacustrine gravels in Emerson Pass indicate a robust geothermal system active at the surface in the recent past, likely the early Holocene.  Structural complexity and spatial heterogeneities of the strain and stress field have developed in the step-over region, but kinematic data suggest a west-northwest-trending (~280° azimuth) extension direction.  The geothermal system is likely hosted in Emerson Pass as a result of enhanced permeability generated by the intersection of two oppositely dipping, southward- terminating north- to north-northwest-striking (Fox Range fault) and north-northeast-striking normal faults.

This publication was prepared with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. We thank the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation for access to tribal lands and logistical support throughout the project.

Available on the Web:
Text:   http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/dox/of1310_text.pdf

Plate:  http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/dox/of1310.pdf

Open-File Report 13-10, one color plate with 3 cross sections, 51.5×39 inches, scale 1:24,000; inset map, scale 1:8,000; 9-page text, b/w, $21.00

  

Open-File Report 13-11
Preliminary Geologic Map of the Southern Lake Range, Washoe County, Nevada
by Peter S. Drakos and James E. Faulds
2013

of1311

The southern Lake Range is dominated by east-tilted Tertiary volcanic rocks cut by a system of west-dipping normal faults.  The Tertiary strata include a thin veneer of Oligocene ash-flow tuff and an ~1 km thick section of middle Miocene (~16 to 13.2 Ma) volcanic rocks (the Pyramid sequence) composed of thick sequences of mafic lavas and minor intercalated dacite, ash-flow tuff, and conglomerate.  The Tertiary rocks rest nonconformably on Mesozoic granitic-metamorphic basement.  Quaternary alluvial fan and lacustrine deposits locally cover older units within the Lake Range and crop out extensively within and along the margins of the adjoining basins.  These basins are complex, east-tilted half grabens, bounded by west-dipping range-front faults along the Lake Range and Nightingale Mountains, and cut by systems of intrabasinal west-dipping normal faults. Cumulative normal displacement on the west-dipping normal fault system in the southern Lake Range area includes ~3.5 to 5.4 km within and along the eastern margin of the Pyramid Lake basin and ~1.8 km within the southern Lake Range.  Concordant dips of strata (~20-35°) throughout the Miocene and Oligocene sections indicate that major extension began after ~13 Ma.  Significant ongoing transtension and multiple fault intersections in the vicinity of the southern Lake Range suggest that this region has relatively high geothermal potential.

This publication was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Final editing and cartography was supported by an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act grant from the Department of Energy. We thank the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation for access to tribal lands and logistical support throughout the project.

Available on the Web:
Text:   http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/dox/of1311_text.pdf

Plate:  http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/dox/of1311.pdf

Open-File Report 13-11, one color plate with cross section, 26.5×24 inches, scale 1:24,000; 5-page text, b/w, $16.00 

Articles on Reno area – in Geosphere

In April 2012, this publication on the Reno area was released:Preliminary revised geologic maps of the Reno urban area, Nevada by Alan R. Ramelli, Christopher D. Henry, and Jerome P. Walker, with contributions by John W. Bell, Patricia H. Cashman,…

In April 2012, this publication on the Reno area was released:
Preliminary revised geologic maps of the Reno urban area, Nevada by Alan R. Ramelli, Christopher D. Henry, and Jerome P. Walker, with contributions by John W. Bell, Patricia H. Cashman, Craig M. dePolo, Larry J. Garside, P. Kyle House, James H. Trexler, and Michael C. Widmer http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/sales/pbsdtls.php?sku=OF11-%207

Authors of this open-file report have just published new articles on the Reno area in Geosphere (June 2012). The abstracts of these articles can be viewed at this Geological Society of America link: http://geosphere.gsapubs.org/content/8/3.toc

Constraints on the history and topography of the northeastern Sierra Nevada from a Neogene sedimentary basin in the Reno-Verdi area, western Nevada, by James Trexler, Patricia Cashman, and Michael Cosca

Distinct mantle sources for Pliocene–Quaternary volcanism beneath the modern Sierra Nevada and adjacent Great Basin, northern California and western Nevada, USA, by Brian Cousens, Christopher D. Henry, and Vishal Gupta