Preliminary geologic map of the Mount Rose NW quadrangle, Washoe County, Nevada


Authors:
Nicholas H. Hinz, Alan R. Ramelli, and Christopher D. Henry
Year:
2018
Series:
Open-File Report 2018-03
Version:
supersedes Open-File Report 2016-06
Format: plate: 35 x 29 inches, color; text: 4 pages, B/W
Scale:
1:24,000
View/download/purchase:

http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Prel-geol-Mount-Rose-NW-p/of2018-03.htm

This quadrangle straddles the north end of the Carson Range directly west-southwest of Reno and abuts the Nevada-California border. The Truckee River and Interstate 80 transect the northwest quarter of the quadrangle. Parts of the City of Reno urban area and Steamboat irrigation ditch fall within the northern part of the quadrangle, and part of a rural community along Thomas Creek is in the southeast quarter.

The bedrock exposures in the quadrangle consist of Mesozoic granitic and metamorphic basement, and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The Tertiary section includes a complex section of lavas, intrusions, and volcanic sedimentary rocks. Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the northern part of the quadrangle are part of an ~1112 Ma ancestral Cascades volcanic center. Generally north-dipping Miocene basalt (~10 Ma) and fluvial-lacustrine sediments rest on the ~11–12 Ma volcanic rocks. Many of the volcanic and sedimentary rocks in the southern part of the quadrangle were derived from a ~6–7 Ma volcanic center in the Mount Rose quadrangle, directly south of this quadrangle. Plio-Pleistocene basaltic andesite lavas locally rest on these late Miocene volcanic rocks in the middle part of the quadrangle. Principal surficial deposits include late Pliocene to modern alluvial fan and fluvial deposits, deposits of the Truckee River, Quaternary glacial deposits, and extensive late Quaternary mass wasting deposits. Notable deep-seated landslide complexes reside in all major drainages—including Thomas Creek, Hunter Creek, Bronco Creek, and the smaller catchments along the west edge of the quadrangle. Most of the Carson Range is west-tilted with west-dipping Cenozoic strata. However, within the Mount Rose NW quadrangle, the dip domain flips and most all the Cenozoic strata dips east with numerous west-dipping normal faults. These west-dipping normal faults are cut by younger east-dipping normal faults of the Mount Rose fault zone on the east side of the range. East-facing Quaternary fault scarps occur on the east side of the range, west-facing Quaternary fault scarps occur on the west side of the range, and the crest of the range is cut by a complex zone of mostly west-facing faults.

This geologic map was funded in part by the USGS National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program under STATEMAP award numbers G15AC00240, 2016, and G17AC00212, 2018.

New Geologic Maps in Northern Nevada: Mount Rose NW and Herder Creek Quadrangles

 

mrnw

Preliminary Geologic Map of the South Half of the Mount Rose NW Quadrangle, Washoe County, Nevada

 Authors: Nicholas H. Hinz and Alan R. Ramelli
Year: 2016
Series: Open-File Report 16-6
Format: plate: 35 x 29 inches, color; text: 3 pages, b/w
Scale: 1:24,000
View/Download/Buy: http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Geol-south-half-Mount-Rose-NW-p/of2016-06.htm

This quadrangle straddles the north end of the Carson Range directly west-southwest of Reno and abuts the Nevada-California border. The Truckee River and Interstate 80 transect the northwest quarter of this quadrangle. This quadrangle also encompasses part of the rural community along Thomas Creek in the southeast quarter, and segments of the Steamboat irrigation ditch and part of the City of Reno urban area fall within the northeast corner.

The bedrock exposures in the quadrangle consist of Mesozoic granitic basement and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The Tertiary section includes a complex section of lavas, intrusions, and volcanic sedimentary rocks. Many of these volcanic and sedimentary rocks were derived from a ~6-7 Ma ancestral Cascades volcanic center in the Mount Rose quadrangle, directly south of this quadrangle. Plio-Pleistocene basaltic andesite lavas and rhyolite domes locally rest on the late Miocene volcanic rocks in the middle part of the quadrangle. Principal surficial deposits include late Pliocene to modern alluvial fan and fluvial deposits, Quaternary glacial deposits, and late Quaternary mass wasting deposits. Notable deep-seated landslide complexes reside in all major drainages—including Thomas Creek, Hunter Creek, Bronco Creek, and the smaller catchments along the west edge of the quadrangle. Most of the Carson Range is west-tilted with west-dipping Cenozoic strata. However, within the Mount Rose NW quadrangle, the dip domain flips and most all the Cenozoic strata dips east with numerous west-dipping normal faults. These west-dipping normal faults are cut by younger east-dipping normal faults of the Mount Rose fault zone on the east side of the range.  East-facing Quaternary fault scarps were observed on the east side of the range and west-facing Quaternary fault scarps were observed on the west side of the range.

This geologic map was funded in part by the USGS National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program under STATEMAP award number G15AC00240, 2016.

 herdercreek

Preliminary Geologic Map of the Herder Creek Quadrangle, Elko County, Nevada
Author: Seth Dee and Michael W. Ressel
Year: 2016
Series: Open-File Report 16-5
Format: plate: 33 x 29 inches, color; text: 5 pages, b/w
Scale: 1:24,000
View/Download/Buy: http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Prel-geol-Herder-Creek-quad-p/of2016-05.htm

The map area covers part of Starr Valley, the upper reaches of the Humboldt River, and the northwest part of the East Humboldt Range.

The Ruby Mountains–East Humboldt Range metamorphic core complex is exposed in the high-relief range front in the southeast part of the quadrangle. In this area, the core complex is comprised of intensely metamorphosed and highly attenuated Neoarchean through Mississippian(?) strata, thought to be part of the platform facies of the Proterozoic through Paleozoic passive margin. Contractional structures exposed in the map area are complex and difficult to discern due to overprinted extensional deformation but are likely part of the Winchell Lake nappe (WLN), a kilometer scale, southward-closing recumbent fold-nappe mapped in adjacent quadrangles to the east. Overturned Devonian to Neoproterozoic(?) meta-sedimentary strata exposed at the highest structural levels are interpreted to be in thrust contact with an underlying, upright sequence of Cambrian to Neoproterozoic(?) paragneiss and Paleoproterozoic to Neoarchean(?) orthogneiss in the core of the fold. This structural interpretation matches those from the adjacent Welcome quadrangle (McGrew and Snoke, 2015; NBMG Map 184). Rocks in the upper part of the metamorphic core complex are pervasively overprinted by a WNW-directed mylonitic shear fabric, which records middle to late Cenozoic extensional exhumation from mid-crustal depths. Abundant sills and lenses of less deformed Oligocene to Cretaceous garnet-muscovite leucogranite and biotite monzogranite intrude all metamorphic rocks in the quadrangle.

The west side of the East Humboldt Range is bound by the active, W-dipping Ruby Mountains frontal fault zone, which extends for more than 60 km to the southwest. A west step-over in the Ruby Mountains fault south of the Herder Creek drainage results in a broad, hanging wall uplift underlain by middle-Miocene to Pliocene strata comprised of NE-dipping to flat-lying tuffaceous sandstone, shale, and conglomerate of the Humboldt Formation and younger units. A tephra in the uppermost exposed section yielded a 40Ar/39Ar age on feldspar of 5.15 ± 1.82 Ma.

Repeated late Quaternary surface-rupturing earthquakes along active traces of the frontal fault are recorded by increased uplift and dissection of Quaternary surfaces as a function of relative age. Fault scarps in Holocene deposits have up to 2.5 m of vertical separation while glacial outwash deposits from the two most recent Pleistocene glacial advances have scarp heights ranging from 6 to 32 m. The upper reaches of several drainages have well-preserved glacial moraine deposits that record the Angel Lake and Lamoille glacial advances. Adjacent to the Humboldt River, in the northwest corner of the quadrangle, 3 sets of abandoned terrace surfaces are preserved, including a broad surface comprised of gravel-rich alluvium that was likely deposited during a period of increased discharge during the latest Pleistocene.

This geologic map was funded in part by the USGS National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program under STATEMAP award number G15AC00240, 2016.

Guidebooks Now Available

1915 Pleasant Valley Earthquake Centennial Field Trip:
If you missed either of these great field trips, you can now download the guidebooks and go on your own trip.

1915 Pleasant Valley earthquake centennial field trip guidebook: A public field trip to visit the largest earthquake in Nevada’s history, by Craig M. dePolo and Alan R. Wallace, 16 pages

Educational Series 58:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/1915-Pleasant-Valley-earthquake-p/e058.htm


Earth Science Week Field Trip to Mount Rose Area

Fire and ice—geology of the Mount Rose quadrangle, Lake Tahoe, and the Carson Range (Guide for the Earth Science Week Field Trip, October 17 and 18, 2015), by Nicholas H. Hinz and Alan R. Ramelli, 20 pages, color

Educational Series 57:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Fire-and-ice-Mount-Rose-p/e057.htm

Earth Science Week Field Trip—Oct 17 and 18—reminder!

Mt_Rose_Hinz_8_south_face_Mt_RoseRGB
Mount Rose, Washoe County, NV. Photographer: Nick Hinz

NBMG Earth Science Week Field Trip 2015:
Fire and Ice—Geology of the Mount Rose Quadrangle, Lake Tahoe, and the Carson Range
Saturday, October 17 or Sunday, October 18
(Sunday is a repeat of Saturday)

Sign up here for this year’s field trip!

This year’s Earth Science Week is October 11-17, 2015 and will celebrate the theme “Visualizing Earth’s Systems.”

NBMG participates in Earth Science Week by coordinating annual geologic field trips for the general public. The field trip is free to the public! Be sure to bring your own water, lunch, sunscreen, hat, first-aid kit, walking stick, gloves, camera, binoculars, bag or bucket for collecting samples, safety glasses if you use a hammer, and a GPS receiver (optional). The day’s activity will involve hiking and climbing around rocks so wear appropriate outdoor clothing and sturdy shoes or hiking boots.

Most of the stops will involve very short walks from the car.  The longest hike will be about two miles round trip along the Mt. Rose trail, beginning and ending at the Mount Rose Highway summit.

This year NBMG will lead a trip to look at recently completed mapping of the Mount Rose quadrangle which covers an area from north shore of Lake Tahoe to north Mount Rose proper, east into the Mount Rose Ski Area, and west to the NV/CA state line.  Our journey will have stops along the Mount Rose Highway (including Mount Rose summit), in Incline Village, and along the north shore of Lake Tahoe.  We will look at the history of volcanoes, glaciers, and faults that have built and continue to build the landscape we see today.

JUST POSTED! You can read the details of the trip in this guide:
http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/ScienceEducation/EarthScienceWeek/e057_text.pdf

The Mount Rose geologic map can be found here:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Prel-geol-Mount-Rose-quad-p/of2014-07.htm

You must sign up online[docs.google.com] prior to the trip and sign a waiver form. Please print out a paper copy, sign and date, and submit prior to the field trip or bring to the field trip starting point.

Field trip participants should meet at 9:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Galena Creek Visitor Center[galenacreekvisitorcenter.org] on the Mt. Rose Highway. Departure will be at 9:30 a.m.

There will be several geologists in attendance to help answer your questions about geology and identify a variety of rocks. There will also be an opportunity to learn more about geocaching and EarthCaching—a high-tech treasure hunting game using GPS devices. If you have a hand-held GPS unit, please bring it.

For questions about the field trip, please call Nick Hinz at 775-784-1446.

For more information about educational activities during Earth Science Week, go to the national Earth Science Week website[earthsciweek.org].

ESW Proclamation by the Governor

Earth Science Week Field Trip—October 17 and 18

NBMG Earth Science Week Field Trip 2015: Fire and Ice—Geology of the Mount Rose Quadrangle, Lake Tahoe, and the Carson Range
Saturday, October 17 or Sunday, October 18 (Sunday is a repeat of Saturday)

Sign up here for this year’s field trip!

This year’s Earth Science Week is October 11-17, 2015 and will celebrate the theme “Visualizing Earth’s Systems.”

NBMG participates in Earth Science Week by coordinating annual geologic field trips for the general public. The field trip is free to the public! Be sure to bring your own water, lunch, sunscreen, hat, first-aid kit, walking stick, gloves, camera, binoculars, bag or bucket for collecting samples, safety glasses if you use a hammer, and a GPS receiver (optional). The day’s activity will involve hiking and climbing around rocks so wear appropriate outdoor clothing and sturdy shoes or hiking boots. One of the hikes will be about two miles.

This year NBMG will lead a trip to look at recently completed mapping of the Mount Rose quadrangle which covers an area from north shore of Lake Tahoe to north Mount Rose proper, east into the Mount Rose Ski Area, and west to the NV/CA state line.  Our journey will have stops along the Mount Rose Highway (including Mount Rose summit), in Incline Village, and along the north shore of Lake Tahoe.  We will look at the history of volcanoes, glaciers, and faults that have built and continue to build the landscape we see today.

The field trip guide and details will be posted in early October.

The Mount Rose geologic map can be found here.

You must sign up online prior to the trip and sign a waiver form. Please print out a paper copy, sign and date, and submit prior to the field trip or bring to the field trip starting point.

Field trip participants should meet at 9:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Galena Creek Visitor Center on the Mt. Rose Highway. Departure will be at 9:30 a.m.

There will be several geologists in attendance to help answer your questions about geology and identify a variety of rocks. There will also be an opportunity to learn more about geocaching and EarthCaching—a high-tech treasure hunting game using GPS devices. If you have a hand-held GPS unit, please bring it.

For questions about the field trip, please call Nick Hinz at 775-784-1446.

For more information about educational activities during Earth Science Week, go to the national Earth Science Week Website.

ESW Proclamation by the Governor

Earth Science Week Field Trip—Oct 17 and 18

Mt_Rose_Hinz_8_south_face_Mt_RoseRGB
Mount Rose, Washoe County, NV. Photographer: Nick Hinz

NBMG Earth Science Week Field Trip 2015:
Fire and Ice—Geology of the Mount Rose Quadrangle, Lake Tahoe, and the Carson Range
Saturday, October 17 or Sunday, October 18
(Sunday is a repeat of Saturday)

Sign up here for this year’s field trip!

This year’s Earth Science Week is October 11-17, 2015 and will celebrate the theme “Visualizing Earth’s Systems.”

NBMG participates in Earth Science Week by coordinating annual geologic field trips for the general public. The field trip is free to the public! Be sure to bring your own water, lunch, sunscreen, hat, first-aid kit, walking stick, gloves, camera, binoculars, bag or bucket for collecting samples, safety glasses if you use a hammer, and a GPS receiver (optional). The day’s activity will involve hiking and climbing around rocks so wear appropriate outdoor clothing and sturdy shoes or hiking boots.

This year NBMG will lead a trip to look at recently completed mapping of the Mount Rose quadrangle which covers an area from north shore of Lake Tahoe to north Mount Rose proper, east into the Mount Rose Ski Area, and west to the NV/CA state line.  Our journey will have stops along the Mount Rose Highway (including Mount Rose summit), in Incline Village, and along the north shore of Lake Tahoe.  We will look at the history of volcanoes, glaciers, and faults that have built and continue to build the landscape we see today.

The field trip guide and details will be posted in early October.

The Mount Rose geologic map can be found here: http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Prel-geol-Mount-Rose-quad-p/of2014-07.htm

You must sign up online[docs.google.com] prior to the trip and sign a waiver form. Please print out a paper copy, sign and date, and submit prior to the field trip or bring to the field trip starting point.

Field trip participants should meet at 9:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Galena Creek Visitor Center[galenacreekvisitorcenter.org] on the Mt. Rose Highway. Departure will be at 9:30 a.m.

There will be several geologists in attendance to help answer your questions about geology and identify a variety of rocks. There will also be an opportunity to learn more about geocaching and EarthCaching—a high-tech treasure hunting game using GPS devices. If you have a hand-held GPS unit, please bring it.

For questions about the field trip, please call Nick Hinz at 775-784-1446.

For more information about educational activities during Earth Science Week, go to the national Earth Science Week website[earthsciweek.org].

ESW Proclamation by the Governor

New Geologic Map: Mount Rose Quadrangle with shaded relief

Open-File Report 14-7
Preliminary geologic map of the Mount Rose quadrangle, Washoe County, Nevada

by Nicholas H. Hinz, Alan R. Ramelli, and James E. Faulds, 2014

of147

A 1:24,000-scale, preliminary geologic map of the Mount Rose 7.5-minute quadrangle in Washoe County, Nevada.  This quadrangle straddles the northern Carson Range directly north of Lake Tahoe and includes much of Incline Village, the Mount Rose Highway, three north Lake Tahoe ski areas, part of the Tahoe Rim Trail, Mount Rose proper, and numerous major tributary drainages to the Truckee River and Lake Tahoe. Mapping of this quadrangle has important implications for understanding earthquake and landslide hazards in the Reno–Carson City–Lake Tahoe region.

The bedrock exposures in the quadrangle consist of Mesozoic crystalline basement and Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks.  The Mesozoic rocks are dominantly granitic with local metamorphic roof pendants.  The Tertiary section includes a complex section of lavas, intrusions, and volcanic sedimentary rocks.  Much of these volcanic and sedimentary rocks were derived from a Miocene ancestral Cascades volcanic center in the northwest quarter of this quadrangle.  Principle surficial deposits include late Pliocene to modern alluvial fan and fluvial deposits, Quaternary glacial deposits, and late Quaternary mass wasting deposits.  Notable deep-seated landslide complexes reside in the Whites Creek, Gray Creek, and First Creek drainages.  The Tertiary section is cut by a system of north-northwest to north-northeast-striking normal and dextral-normal faults with both down-to-west and down-to-east sense of displacement, kinematically linked with a system of northeast to east-northeast-striking sinistral-normal faults.  Detailed mapping of Quaternary fault scarps associated with the Incline Village fault zone benefited greatly from publicly available, high-resolution LiDAR data for the Tahoe basin.

This publication was prepared as part of the STATEMAP component of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey.

Open-File Report 14-7, scale 1:24,000, 39 x 28 inches, color; 4-page text, b/w; folded or rolled, $18.00       

Be sure and check out the new shaded relief format on this map of Mount Rose.

Available free on the Web or purchase here: http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/sales/pbsdtls.php?sku=OF14-%207