Tag Archive | Great Basin

Association of Engineering Geologists, Great Basin Chapter: Monthly Dinner Meeting—January 10, 2019

SPEAKER: Shawn Gooch, P.E.
TOPIC: Water Pollution Control Permitting in Nevada for Metals Mining

https://www.aegweb.org/group/GB

ABSTRACT: Metals mining in the State of Nevada that uses mechanized equipment is required to obtain a  Water  Pollution  Control  Permit  from  the  Department  of  Conservation  and  Natural Resources, Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Mining Regulation and Reclamation (BMRR) pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes 445A and Nevada Administrative Code  445A. BMRR’s Regulation Branch operates under these statues and codes with a mission to provide protection of “Waters of the State” by enforcing water pollution control regulations at mining facilities. The presentation will provide an overview of typical water pollution control permitting for small and large scale metals mining. The presentation will also cover new 2018 regulations and upcoming changes and improvements to the permitting process. Some general attention will be given to reclamation and closure topics as well as inspection and compliance activities. The presentation will emphasize containment of process solution through a variety of methods including use of synthetic liner systems, secondary containment systems, double containment, and QA/QC procedures.

For a detailed biography, please click here:
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e3fe5826ea2196948cdbbc1a2/files/bd63f0e7-a7fb-448f-bf90-e55dcb65e9a9/Bio_Abstract_Shawn_Gooch.pdf

The Bar is sponsored, and we are providing complimentary dinners to the first three students who submit RSVP’s. Any additional students will be charged $25.

LOCATION:
SURE STAY PLUS HOTEL
BY BEST WESTERN
1981 TERMINAL WAY
RENO, NEVADA 89502

SOCIAL HOUR: 5:15PM; DINNER: 6:00PM; PRESENTATION: 7:00PM
Social Hour Sponsored by Doug and Merrily Graham
Cost: Members: $30.00 ~ Non-Members: $32.00 ~ Students: $25.00
Currently seeking a sponsor for student dinners!

RSVP NO LATER THAN 5PM, TUESDAY, JANUARY 8th (lenient) to mkgraham75@gmail.com

Please give us a 48 Hour Cancellation Notice if you are not able to attend. “No shows” without proper notification will be charged. You will be responsible for your invited guests who do not comply with the cancellation request.  Thank you.

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NMEC 2018 Great Basin Rendezvous—September 13–16

The 6th Annual Great Basin Rendezvous registration is now available!

“It is that time of year again to begin sign-up for Nevada Mineral Exploration Coalition’s 2018 Great Basin Rendezvous. This year, we have added an extra day to the front, so the GBR will be held from Thursday, September 13 at 1:00 p.m. through Sunday, September 16, 2018, at Camp Lamoille in the Ruby Mountains. The cost for an NMEC member is $20.00 and for a non-member is $100.00 (includes a 1 year NMEC membership – good through 2019). Additional family members are $10.00.

For those of you who have never been to Camp Lamoille in the Ruby Mountains, it is situated in a beautiful glacial valley located approximately 25 miles southeast of Elko, Nevada.”

On Saturday, September 15 there will be a “9:00 AM field trip led by Larry Garside, Research Geologist Emeritus, Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. This will be a driving field trip focusing on geology of the Ruby Mountains with added historical discussions from the town of Lamoille, up and over Secret Pass, south along the east flank of the Rubies, up and over Harrison pass…” (from NMEC website)

To sign up, please go to the NVMEC website:
https://www.nvmec.org/gbrregistration

AEG Great Basin Monthly Meeting – January 18th

Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists, Great Basin Chapter, Monthly Meeting
http://www.aegweb.org/group/GB
http://www.aegweb.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=1056072&group=149913

SPEAKER: Jesse Ruzicka, P.E.
Principal Engineer, Nevada Department of Transportation
TOPIC: Soil Nails in the Lake Tahoe Basin: Lessons Learned

BIOGRAPHY
Mr. Ruzicka graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno in 2003 with an undergraduate degree in Geological Engineering. Since that time, he has been involved in numerous projects providing geotechnical design and support for residential developments, flood control projects in Sacramento and Reno, commercial/industrial developments, roadway and bridge design, and mining projects in Nevada, Canada, and Mexico. Most recently Mr. Ruzicka’s experience has been focused on the transportation industry, where he is currently the principal geotechnical engineer on several of NDOT’s recent projects including Phase II of the Boulder City Bypass, the I-15/US93 Garnet Interchange, SR28 Shared Use Path at Lake Tahoe, and the rockfall mitigation at Logan Shoals.

Mr. Ruzicka has been involved with AEG since 2001, serving as a past secretary of the Great Basin Section from 2010 to 2013 and chair from 2014 to 2016.

ABSTRACT:
Soil nailing is one of the many tools available to the geotechnical professional when constructing vertical excavations and stabilizing existing slopes. Due to their economy, technical advantages, and relatively quick construction process, soil nails are commonly used in temporary excavations as well as permanent retaining applications. This presentation will summarize the concepts for designing soil nails in retaining wall and slope stability applications, construction, and load testing of soil nails, emphasizing the importance of involvement by the designer during construction.

Recent experiences from projects such as Logan Shoals and the SR28 Shared Use Path in Lake Tahoe have provided several lessons learned that will be shared during the presentation.

LOCATION:
SURE STAY PLUS HOTEL
BY BEST WESTERN (Hotel name change – same location)
1981 TERMINAL WAY
RENO, NEVADA 89502
SOCIAL HOUR: 5:30PM
DINNER: 6:30PM
PRESENTATION: 7:00PM
COST: Members: $27.00 ~ Non-Members: $30.00 ~ Students: $20.00

The Social Hour is sponsored by Madole Construction – Open Bar

RSVP to Merrily Graham NO LATER THAN 5PM, TUESDAY, JANUARY 16TH:
mkgraham75@gmail.com
Please give us a 48 Hour Cancellation notice if you are not able to attend.

AEG Monthly Dinner Meeting—April 20—RSVP BY TODAY April 18!

Mackay Student Speakers Presenting for a Grand Prize of $300!A message from AEG: We would love to have many professionals attend this meeting to ask questions, provide feedback, and help us vote for the winning presentation!

Here are the students and their topics:

  • Sage Gandolfo—An Overview of the Geology of Finland Including the Fennoscandian Craton (Baltic Shield)
  • Evan Saint-Pierre—Lateral Loads on Drilled Vertical Shafts Caused by Caliche
  • Meredith Kraner—Earthquake Weather—Evaluating Seasonal Deformation in the Vicinity of Active Fault Structures in Central California using GPS Data
  • Andrew Pugh—NSF funded research project studying the evolution of the Santa Rosalia basin in Baja California Sur

LOCATION: BEST WESTERN AIRPORT PLAZA COURT RESTAURANT 1981 TERMINAL WAY RENO, NEVADA 89502
SOCIAL HOUR: 5:30 PM DINNER: 6:30 PM PRESENTATIONS: 7:00 PM
RSVP NO LATER THAN 5PM, TUESDAY APRIL 18, 2017 @ 775-303-8271 or ATHIBEDEAU@NEWFIELDS.COM
Cost: Members: $25.00; non-members: $29.00; Students: Free Student Dinners Sponsored by AEG

Structure and Geothermal Fluid Flow in the Great Basin: From the Regional-Scale to the Outcrop-Scale: A Presentation by Drew Siler – Monday April 4 at 4:00

Structure and Geothermal Fluid Flow in the Great Basin: From the Regional-Scale to the Outcrop-Scale
A presentation by Assistant Professor faculty position candidate:
Drew Siler, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Monday, April 4, 2016 (4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.)
Davidson Math & Science, Room 102 (DMSC 102)
http://www.unr.edu/around-campus/facilities/davidson

Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation Talks: Great Basin Geology

 

TMPF_logo_final_jpeg
Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation is sponsoring a presentation on “Great Basin Geology” on Monday February 8:
http://www.tmparksfoundation.org/

Location: The California Building at Idlewild Park, 75 Cowan Drive, Reno
Date: Monday February 8, 2016
Time: 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

NO RSVP NECESSARY! For more information, questions, or concerns, please email Jackie Meyer at jackie@tmparksfoundation.org

Guest Speakers:
Jim E. Faulds, Ph.D. (NBMG Director and State Geologist)
Christopher D. Henry, Ph.D. (NBMG Research Geologist)
Annie Kell, Ph.D. (Nevada Seismological Lab, Education/Outreach Seismologist)

“Did you know there were once active volcanoes in our area? What about the fault line running through Virginia Lake? Come find out about our region’s rich geology!” (TMPF website)

You are invited to join Jim Faulds, Chris Henry, and Annie Kell for free public lectures covering topics such as earthquake hazards, geothermal energy, and ancient volcanoes.

Living on the Edge in Western Nevada:
Our Rapidly Evolving Geologic Setting along a Developing Tectonic Boundary
…by Jim Faulds

Jim Faulds will give an overview of the geologic-tectonic setting of the region, discussing how this region contains faults related to the San Andreas plate boundary and is also being extended or stretched such that Nevada is the “fastest growing” state, tectonically speaking.  He will briefly touch upon how this is relevant to some of our natural resources (e.g. geothermal) and also our geologic hazards.

Young Volcanoes in Western Nevada – Eastern California
…by Chris Henry

Chris Henry will talk about young volcanoes in western Nevada – eastern California, all of which people can visit.  That’s partly young by geologic standards, i.e., only 1 million years old, but includes some young ones by human standards.  Nevada and the Lake Tahoe area have lots of basaltic volcanoes as young as 1 million years, Soda Lakes near Fallon are less than 10,000 years possibly about 1500 years (so humans would have been around), and there’s geophysical evidence for igneous magma propagating upward below the north end of Lake Tahoe.  Just across the border Lassen erupted in 1915, Mono Craters as recently as about 600 years ago, and the Long Valley caldera and Bishop Tuff 770,000 years ago.  State lines are irrelevant to geology.  The Long Valley caldera–Bishop Tuff eruption was a “supervolcano” (so like Yellowstone, which has been more commonly in the news) that, if repeated today (not predicting anything), would have much more impact on Nevada than on San Francisco or Los Angeles.

Earthquake History and Preparedness in Northern Nevada
…by Annie Kell

Northern Nevada has hosted numerous large earthquakes in recent history – including many in the Truckee Meadows. Though it has been many years since an event larger than M5.0 in the area, at one time the average recurrence for a M6.0 was 12 years! This presentation will include some details of the earthquakes that have occurred in the last 150 years, as well as what we can do to be prepared for the next big one.

You can also read the NSL Newsletter by Annie Kell here:
What’s Shaking? – January NSL Newsletter
http://www.seismo.unr.edu/Announcements

Dr. Jim Faulds lecture – March 28 in Carson City

Who:  State Geologist and NBMG Director, Jim Faulds

What:  Frances Humphrey Lecture Series

Title:  Why is Nevada in Hot Water?: Tectonic Controls on Geothermal Activity in the Great Basin

When:  Thursday, March 28, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Early arrival recommended; doors open at 6:00 p.m.

Where:  Nevada State Museum, 600 N. Carson Street, Carson City

Why:  To learn more about geology, plate tectonics, geothermal activity in the Great Basin, and recent research regarding alternative energy technologies

Admission:  $8 for adults and free for museum members and ages 17 and under

Details about the topic:
Geothermal studies enhance understanding of what controls hot fluids in the earth’s crust and aid in exploration and discovery of energy resources.  Scientists study geologic faults, stress conditions, and stratigraphy to determine where to drill.

More about the speaker:
State geologist Jim Faulds is an award-winning scholar and professor in geothermal research and development. He published numerous papers on the subject and presented his work at many conferences, including the World Geothermal Congress in Bali, Indonesia and the GEONZ2010 Geoscience-Geothermal Conference in Auckland, New Zealand.  According to Faulds, “Our research will provide the baseline studies that are absolutely needed if Nevada is going to become the Saudi Arabia of geothermal.”

Contact information: Deborah Stevenson: dstevenson@nevadaculture.org or 775-687-4810, ext. 237