Anniversary of April 24, 1914 Earthquake in Reno—TODAY

Read this 2006 report for details of the April 24, 1914 earthquake [M6.1 ± 0.3] that hit the Reno area.

The November 21, 1910 Tonopah Junction Earthquake, and the February 18, 1914 and April 24, 1914 Reno Earthquakes in Nevada
by Craig M. dePolo and Terri M. Garside (Open-File Report 2006-02)
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/1910-Tonopah-1914-Reno-EQs-p/of2006-02.htm

“The April 24th earthquake was the largest event in the 1914 Reno earthquake sequence, and it was the largest earthquake in the United States that year. The nighttime earthquake (12:34 a.m. PST) caused damage in Reno, and was felt as far north as Winnemucca, as far east as Elko, as far west as Berkeley, and as far south as Randsburg in California; it might have been felt even further out if it had occurred during the daytime. People were awakened from their sleep as far away as the Great Valley in California, and in Sacramento, people rushed to the streets from buildings in their nightclothes. At least five aftershocks were felt through the night following the mainshock; earthquakes were also reported on April 25 and 26, which were either aftershocks or possibly related to a second earthquake source area to the south, closer to Virginia City.”

The earthquake was most severe at University Hill knocking down two chimneys at Manzanita Hall, leveling two chimneys at Lincoln Hall, and toppling the stack on the Hatch building. Glassware was broken and instruments were upset in the physical and chemical laboratories. At least one residence lost several square meters of plaster in a bedroom, had a chimney shaken to its foundations spilling bricks, and had a broken window. In Virginia City, people who were up dashed into the streets, pictures were jarred from the walls, dishes were thrown from shelves, and plaster was broken from ceilings of some residences.”

Seismic Hazards in the Reno-Carson City Urban Corridor
by Craig dePolo (Nevada Geology, Spring 1992)
http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/_docs/Newsletters/nl14.htm

“The Reno-Carson City urban corridor has one of the highest seismic hazards in the state of Nevada. Historical earthquakes are often the most convincing evidence of a local seismic hazard, and the Reno-Carson City urban corridor has had several damaging historical earthquakes.”

Living with Earthquakes in Nevada
by Craig M. dePolo, Lucy K. Jones, Diane M. dePolo, and Susan Tingley
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Living-with-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp027.htm

This handbook identifies the earthquake threat to Nevada and reviews earthquake safety, how to be prepared for earthquakes, and mitigation of hazards from shaking and fault offset.

Be PreparedJoin the Shakeout!
https://www.shakeout.org/nevada/

AAA Road to Ready: Disaster Preparedness Made Fun
Nearly 60% of Americans say they’re not prepared for a natural disaster.
Learn what it takes to be ready. Play AAA Road to Ready.

Carson Valley Earthquake Anniversary—June 3, 1887

Tomorrow is the anniversary of the 1887, June 3 Carson Valley earthquake.

1887, June 3 Carson Valley Earthquake
EARTHQUAKE SUMMARY

“This was a violent earthquake in western Nevada’s history, with damaging effects spanning from Carson City to Genoa. Several buildings were likely torn down or parts rebuilt because of earthquake damage.

The earthquake began at about 2:40 to 2:47 A.M. on Friday, June 3, 1887 (PST). It was reported to have lasted from 3 to 10 seconds (in one account 30 seconds) and was preceded by a heavy rumbling sound (which is described as resembling a dead-axe freight wagon driven rapidly over frozen ground, CDI 6/7/87). There are no foreshocks reported, and only three slight shocks were reported immediately following at about 3 A.M. (Table _ lists 12 reported aftershocks from 20 days following the event). Miners coming off work from Gold Hill could plainly see the buildings of Virginia City vibrating and felt the earth moving under their feet (VEC 6/3/87). Some that were outside looked at the moon and noted that the vibration was as plainly visible to the organ of sight as it was to the sense of feeling (VEC 6/7/87). James Raycraft was rushing for a doctor in Carson City when the shock threw him face forward to the ground (MA 6/3/87). Other people on the streets of Carson City were also thrown to the ground (TE 6/4/87). There was general hysteria in Carson City, Genoa, and Virginia City, and most people vacated their premises wearing only the garments they were sleeping in. “The inhabitants of every house in town were roused from their slumbers, and few sought their beds until morning sun gave evidence that another day was granted” (TNT 6/3/87). The streets were filled with people, some badly frightened, some considerably amused, and all chattering volubly over the occurrence, with each person relating their own personal experience (MA 6/3/87). In Genoa, every man, woman, and child apparently joined together in prayers on Main Street.

The 1887 earthquake caused damage to buildings in Carson City, Genoa, Carson Valley, and to a minor extent in Virginia City. Nonstructural damage extended westward into Lake Tahoe, and into the central Sierra Nevada.”

 The excerpt shown above is from page 94 of this publication:
Reevaluation of pre-1900 earthquakes in western Nevada
By Craig M. dePolo, Alan R. Ramelli, Ron H. Hess, and John G. Anderson


EARTHQUAKES IN NEVADA

Current Nevada Earthquake Activity
Nevada Seismological Laboratory

Historical Nevada Earthquake Activity
MyHazards Nevada
See Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology ArcGIS Web Application: MyHazards Nevada.
Turn on the earthquake layer (expand with the arrow to turn on the lower magnitudes).
Click on an earthquake epicenter to get the date.

Read More Here
http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/_docs/Newsletters/nl14.htm

http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/_docs/Newsletters/nl14a.htm

http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Damaging-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp037.htm

http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/nhmpc/Presentations/Earthquake_Hazard_Presentations/Earthquake_Hazards_in_Douglas_County_9August2012.pdf

http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/Geohazards/index.html

http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/What-s-shakin-in-the-neighborh-p/e034.htm  (road log covers Genoa fault)

http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Turbulent-times-in-the-Truckee-p/e033.htm  (road log covers faults in the Truckee Meadows)

1997 New Year’s Floods—20th Anniversary

1997flood

The start of the new year marked the 20th anniversary of the devastating 1997 New Year’s floods of western Nevada, which caused over 450 million dollars in damage and closed downtown businesses in Reno for weeks. This event was caused by a phenomena known as the “Pineapple Express” (more generally known as an “atmospheric river”) in which several warm storms tapped into moisture plumes sourced near the Hawaiian Islands. These storms produced heavy rainfall in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, saturating the soil and melting existing snow pack resulting in flows around 18,000 cfs in the Truckee River. Footage from that event is shared below from the KTVN Channel 2 News Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nevada-Bureau-of-Mines-and-Geology/106397989390636
https://www.facebook.com/KTVN2/videos/10150832012069966/?pnref=story

You can also see the 1997 flood extents for the Carson River, Reno area, and Walker River in NBMG’s MyHazards-Nevada interactive web map:

https://gisweb.unr.edu/myhazards/

Click the “Floods and Drought” group (wave icon) then checkmark on the “Historical Floods – NBMG” layer to turn on the 1997 flood layers. Several sublayers available for each flood area, which can be viewed by clicking the gray triangle next to the layer names to expand the layers.

Given that western Nevada has a flood watch in effect for this weekend, it’s worth noting that there are other useful layers available in MyHazards-Nevada, such as live feeds for weather watches and advisories, radar, and current flooding, in addition to layers for other geologic hazards including a live feed for recent earthquakes.

For those interested in learning more about the 1997 New Year’s floods, NBMG Special Publication 23 is a detailed report on that event:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/1997-New-Year-s-floods-w-NV-p/sp023.htm
Links to other flood- and weather-related publications are available on this landing page.

News from Nevada Today

big%20hill%20seismo%20installation%20dsc_0039
Photo: UNR

Hawthorne, Nev. hit by three magnitude 5.5 to 5.7 earthquakes
by Mike Wolterbeek, Nevada Today, 12/28/16

“Three magnitude 5.5 to 5.7 earthquakes struck about 18 miles southwest of Hawthorne, Nevada just after midnight Wednesday December 28, 2016, the Nevada Seismological Laboratory at the University of Nevada, Reno reported. Reports so far indicate minimal damage due to the remote nature of the earthquake sequence.”

Read more:
http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2016/hawthorne-earthquakes?utm_source=newsletter122716

 

nevadaradonpotentialmap1180
Photo: UNR


Learn how to reduce the radon health risk
by Tiffany Kozsan, Nevada Today, 12/27/16

“January is National Radon Action Month, and University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Radon Education Program is offering free radon test kits and educational presentations at various locations across the state. Free test kits are available at Cooperative Extension offices and partner offices statewide from Jan. 1 through Feb 28, and will also be available at the presentations.”

 Read more:
http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2016/2017-radon-presentations-and-test-kits?utm_source=newsletter122716

Fairview Peak and Dixie Valley Earthquakes M7.1 and M6.9 — December 16, 1954

1954_6_dixie_valley_karl_steinbrugge
Ground offset of about eight feet from the 1954 Dixie Valley earthquake forming the small cliff to the left of the cabin. Karl Steinbrugge photo from NBMG Special Publications 27 and 37.

 

You can visit the site of these earthquakes and view the scarps using this road guide:
The Great Highway 50 Rock Tour, by D.D LaPointe, David Davis, Jon Price and Beth Price
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/The-great-Highway-50-rock-tour-p/e044.htm

You can also take a virtual tour of the area and view the scarps—check out the Travel Nevada links on theNBMG Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nevada-Bureau-of-Mines-and-Geology/106397989390636[facebook.com]

This excerpt was taken from NBMG Special Publication 37:
Damaging Earthquakes in Nevada: 1840s to 2008, by Craig dePolo:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Damaging-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp037.htm

On December 16, 1954 there were two large, back-to-back earthquakes east of the Fallon area that were felt throughout Nevada and created several large ground ruptures. The first event, the Fairview Peak earthquake, a right-normal-oblique-slip event, occurred at 3:07 a.m. PST and had a magnitude of 7.1 (Pancha and others, 2006). This was followed four minutes and 20 seconds later (3:11 a.m.) by a magnitude 6.9 event, the Dixie Valley earthquake, a normal-slip event (Slemmons and others, 1965). Both earthquakes created spectacular surface ruptures over a total area of 100 km (62 mi) long and 14.5 km (9 mi) wide, with ground offsets of as much as 3.8 m (12.5 ft) vertical and 2.9 m (9.5 ft) right lateral (Slemmons, 1957; Caskey and others, 1996).

The earthquake was in a sparsely populated region, and there were no reported injuries and only minor building damage and content losses. In Dixie Valley, an “adobe cellar, gasoline tank and water tank, and stone wall collapsed,” a stove moved several feet, and a woman was thrown from her bed due to the shaking (Murphy and Cloud, 1956). In one living room, a piano “kangarooed” its way to the opposite side of the room during the shaking (FS 12/22/54). In the surrounding region, dishes broke, walls and chimneys were cracked in the towns of Austin, Luning, Mina, Rawhide, Fallon, Lovelock, Eureka, and Carson City (Murphy and Cloud, 1956). Damage in Carson City included cracked walls and fallen plaster in the Capitol building, the State Printing Building, and the State Prison (Murphy and Cloud, 1956). Water lines were broken at Lovelock, Mina and near Gabbs (Murphy and Cloud, 1956).

PERSPECTIVE (by Craig dePolo)
After 1959, earthquake activity subsided in the Fallon region and has been at a relatively low level since then. However, Nevada has a rich earthquake history, over 1500 Quaternary faults, and has active deformation detected by geodetic measurements. Major earthquakes are in Nevada’s future and much attention will be focused on these events when they occur and on earthquake preparedness and resilience. Nevada has had a window of opportunity to prepare for the next events, and great things such as freeway bridge seismic retrofits have occurred during this window. But preparedness for earthquakes must continue, especially at a personal level, if we are to have fewer injuries and property losses from future events. “Give the gift of preparedness.”