Nevada’s First Recorded Earthquake Death? This Could Be It, Caused by Ridgecrest Temblors

By Rong-Gong Lin II, Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times
August. 6, 2019 6 AM

Excerpts are copied below. You can read the complete story here: Nevada’s First Recorded Earthquake Death? This Could Be It, Caused by Ridgecrest Temblors

“For all the power of the Ridgecrest earthquakes — the strongest with an epicenter in Southern California in nearly two decades — the only death related to the temblors may have actually occurred outside the state.

The death in Nevada is illustrative of the significant earthquake risk the Silver State, though not as bad as California, still endures. The Reno area, for instance, has a seismic risk that approaches that of the San Francisco Bay Area, according to Nevada state geologists…

There has never been a documented death from an earthquake in Nevada, according to Craig dePolo, earthquake geologist at the state Bureau of Mines and Geology, who has exhaustively researched records of the 23 earthquakes with epicenters in Nevada of magnitude 6 or greater. “If indeed Mr. Ray’s death was caused by an earthquake, it would be the first time it’s been recorded,” he said…

Nevada has been largely quiet of destructive earthquakes since the 1960s, except for the magnitude 6 Wells earthquake of 2008, which caused an abandoned two-story building to collapse and two more buildings to partially collapse, and damaged about 30 others. Officials reported $19 million in damage.

But from the 1850s to the 1950s, there were 22 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater in Nevada.

“Up until about the 1960s, Nevada was very active,” dePolo said. “It used to be known as an earthquake state, just like California. But we’ve lost a lot of the folklore because there’s been fewer earthquakes. Awareness is moderate to low.”

Nevada is farther away from the main plate boundary dividing the Pacific and North American plates, but the state still gathers seismic strain over the decades that must be released in earthquakes eventually. “The handle is turning, and the box is there — it’s just a matter of time before the jack-in-the-box pops out.”

The Reno area has an earthquake risk approaching that of San Francisco, dePolo said; Las Vegas’ risk is less, but still exists. Faults in the basin Reno sits in is capable of generating earthquakes as big as magnitude 6.8; a larger fault in the Carson Valley just south of Reno could generate a quake as large as magnitude 7.4.

Just east of Las Vegas is Frenchman Mountain, and on the east side of the mountain lies an earthquake fault capable of producing an earthquake of possibly magnitude 6.7, dePolo said.”

Anniversary of April 24, 1914 Earthquake in Reno—TODAY

Read this 2006 report for details of the April 24, 1914 earthquake [M6.1 ± 0.3] that hit the Reno area.

The November 21, 1910 Tonopah Junction Earthquake, and the February 18, 1914 and April 24, 1914 Reno Earthquakes in Nevada
by Craig M. dePolo and Terri M. Garside (Open-File Report 2006-02)
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/1910-Tonopah-1914-Reno-EQs-p/of2006-02.htm

“The April 24th earthquake was the largest event in the 1914 Reno earthquake sequence, and it was the largest earthquake in the United States that year. The nighttime earthquake (12:34 a.m. PST) caused damage in Reno, and was felt as far north as Winnemucca, as far east as Elko, as far west as Berkeley, and as far south as Randsburg in California; it might have been felt even further out if it had occurred during the daytime. People were awakened from their sleep as far away as the Great Valley in California, and in Sacramento, people rushed to the streets from buildings in their nightclothes. At least five aftershocks were felt through the night following the mainshock; earthquakes were also reported on April 25 and 26, which were either aftershocks or possibly related to a second earthquake source area to the south, closer to Virginia City.”

The earthquake was most severe at University Hill knocking down two chimneys at Manzanita Hall, leveling two chimneys at Lincoln Hall, and toppling the stack on the Hatch building. Glassware was broken and instruments were upset in the physical and chemical laboratories. At least one residence lost several square meters of plaster in a bedroom, had a chimney shaken to its foundations spilling bricks, and had a broken window. In Virginia City, people who were up dashed into the streets, pictures were jarred from the walls, dishes were thrown from shelves, and plaster was broken from ceilings of some residences.”

Seismic Hazards in the Reno-Carson City Urban Corridor
by Craig dePolo (Nevada Geology, Spring 1992)
http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/_docs/Newsletters/nl14.htm

“The Reno-Carson City urban corridor has one of the highest seismic hazards in the state of Nevada. Historical earthquakes are often the most convincing evidence of a local seismic hazard, and the Reno-Carson City urban corridor has had several damaging historical earthquakes.”

Living with Earthquakes in Nevada
by Craig M. dePolo, Lucy K. Jones, Diane M. dePolo, and Susan Tingley
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Living-with-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp027.htm

This handbook identifies the earthquake threat to Nevada and reviews earthquake safety, how to be prepared for earthquakes, and mitigation of hazards from shaking and fault offset.

Be PreparedJoin the Shakeout!
https://www.shakeout.org/nevada/

AAA Road to Ready: Disaster Preparedness Made Fun
Nearly 60% of Americans say they’re not prepared for a natural disaster.
Learn what it takes to be ready. Play AAA Road to Ready.

Shake Out—Don’t Freak Out! October 18, 2018

A message from the Great Nevada ShakeOut: “International ShakeOut Day is October 18, but you can also take action right now to prepare to survive and recover! Start with the Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety, share the drill manuals and other guides on the ShakeOut Resources page, and participate in the ShakeOut conversation on social media with #ShakeOut. We’re all in this together – what we do now determines how well we bounce back from the next significant earthquake!”

ShakeOut
https://www.shakeout.org/index.html

https://www.shakeout.org/nevada/

Louise Sattler of SigningFamilies.com explains the importance of ShakeOut, in sign language, open captioning, and voice!

ShakeOut Information in Sign Language, by Signing Families with Louise Sattler
https://www.shakeout.org/california/resources/videos.html


Learn More About Earthquakes

The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, IRIS, has a great collection of resources communicating and educating about earthquake science. Visit IRIS.edu to navigate to animations, videos, lesson plans, and more!

News from Nevada Today

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Photo: UNR

Hawthorne, Nev. hit by three magnitude 5.5 to 5.7 earthquakes
by Mike Wolterbeek, Nevada Today, 12/28/16

“Three magnitude 5.5 to 5.7 earthquakes struck about 18 miles southwest of Hawthorne, Nevada just after midnight Wednesday December 28, 2016, the Nevada Seismological Laboratory at the University of Nevada, Reno reported. Reports so far indicate minimal damage due to the remote nature of the earthquake sequence.”

Read more:
http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2016/hawthorne-earthquakes?utm_source=newsletter122716

 

nevadaradonpotentialmap1180
Photo: UNR


Learn how to reduce the radon health risk
by Tiffany Kozsan, Nevada Today, 12/27/16

“January is National Radon Action Month, and University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Radon Education Program is offering free radon test kits and educational presentations at various locations across the state. Free test kits are available at Cooperative Extension offices and partner offices statewide from Jan. 1 through Feb 28, and will also be available at the presentations.”

 Read more:
http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2016/2017-radon-presentations-and-test-kits?utm_source=newsletter122716

Great Nevada ShakeOut—October 20 at 10:20

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“Millions of people worldwide will practice how to Drop, Cover, and Hold On at 10:20 a.m. on October 20th during Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills!

Nevadans can join them today by registering for the 2016 Great Nevada ShakeOut. Participating is a great way for your family or organization to be prepared to survive and recover quickly from big earthquakes– wherever you live, work, or travel.”

http://www.shakeout.org/nevada/[shakeout.org]

Also check out the NBMG website for more information on earthquakes:

http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/Geohazards/index.html

http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Living-with-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp027.htm

The Great Nevada Shakeout 2016

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“The recent earthquakes in Japan and Ecuador have been devastating reminders of how better prepared we can all be. Each year, it is why we join together in ShakeOut – to get ready for the earthquakes in our future. On 10/20 at 10:20 a.m., join your community again and focus on improving your level of preparedness. We are all in this together!”

Get ready to shakeout:
http://shakeout.org/nevada/[shakeout.org]