AEG Monthly Meeting—Thursday, March 12 Association of Environmental & Engineering Geologists

AEG_Logo_Revised-9-28-05_0

Speaker: Stephen Dickenson, Adjunct Research Faculty, Nevada Seismological Laboratory, UNR

Topic: Post-Earthquake Forensic Investigations of Soil-Structure Interaction:  A Sleuth’s Guide to Seismological, Geological, and Geotechnical Clues 

Abstract: This presentation will focus on lessons learned from field observations and forensic evaluations of building foundations made by Dr. Dickenson and his colleagues at sites in Wellington, New Zealand following the 2016 Mw 7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake. An overview will be provided that addresses seismological aspects of the strong ground motions recorded at the project sites and the significant impact of local geology on the strength of the ground shaking. This overview will lead into the case study of seismic performance of a five-story, pile-supported building, which was built in 2009, well instrumented with accelerometers, and had been subjected to two prior Mw 6.5 earthquakes. The project team was charged with evaluating the likelihood of significant damage to the pile foundations; a forensic investigation that required thorough seismological, geological, and geotechnical evaluation.

Biography: Stephen Dickenson is the President of New Albion Geotechnical, Inc., a consultancy specializing in geotechnical earthquake engineering applications for major civil works. Dr. Dickenson’s consulting, research, and post-earthquake reconnaissance efforts have primarily focused on dynamic soil-structure-interaction and the seismic performance of slopes and earth structures, earth retention systems, bridges, port and coastal facilities, and buildings. He has led, and supported, numerous investigations of the seismic performance of civil infrastructure involving development on weak soils, deep foundations and buried utilities subjected to ground failure, and the effectiveness of ground treatment for mitigating hazards.

Dr. Dickenson earned his Bachelor’s degree in Geology from the University of California, Berkeley, his Master’s Degree in Civil Engineering from Virginia Tech, and his Doctorate in Civil Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a licensed Civil Engineer (CA, NV, OR, WA) and board-certified Diplomate in Port Engineering (ACOPNE D. PE) with over 30 years of experience in consulting practice, academia, applied research, and development of continuing education for geo-professionals. He has resided in numerous places along a circuitous path from the San Francisco Bay Area to the Pacific Northwest, and now makes his home in Reno where he enjoys all of the outdoor time he can get.

https://mcusercontent.com/e3fe5826ea2196948cdbbc1a2/files/dcce64a9-0f98-4a7d-8e7a-09692413b532/Stephen_Dickensonbio_abstract.pdf

Details:
LOCATION:
SURESTAY PLUS HOTEL BY BEST WESTERN, 1981 TERMINAL WAY, RENO, NEVADA 89502
SOCIAL HOUR: 5:15PM
DINNER: 6:00PM
PRESENTATION: 7:00PM

RSVP TO MERRILY GRAHAM NO LATER THAN 5:00 PM, TUESDAY, MARCH 10TH:
mkgraham75@gmail.com

This month we will be serving corned beef, salad, and key lime pie. On the RSVP, please indicate if you have a dietary restriction such as vegan, vegetarian or gluten free options.

Reminders of upcoming geology talks

AEG MeetingJahns LectureThursday, February 6:

Scott Lindvall—Characterizing Fault Displacement Hazards: Significant Progress and Significant Uncertainties

Read details here:
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/e3fe5826ea2196948cdbbc1a2/files/43ba9346-fa5f-44b3-ba5e-458041cddd6d/BioAbstract_word.pdf

RSVP NO LATER THAN 5 PM, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 TO:
Merrily Graham
360-606-1838
mkgraham75@gmail.com


Discover Science Lecture Series
Thursday, February 6:

William F. Tate IV—Is Space + Race > STEM Opportunity?

Read details here:
https://www.unr.edu/science/discover-science


AEG/GSA 2019
2020 Richard H. Jahns Distinguished LecturerFriday, February 7:

Speaker: Scott Lindvall

Topic: A Tale of Three Dams along the Owens Valley Fault System

Biography: Scott Lindvall is a Certified Engineering Geologist in California with 35 years of experience working in the consulting industry performing seismic and geologic hazard analyses, fault investigations, and engineering geology studies for both existing and proposed critical facilities.

Location: Pennington Medical Education Building, Room 12 (NE corner of UNR campus)

Date/Time: Friday, February 7 (11:30–1:30 PM)

Free lecture is open to the public.

Shuttle service will be provided to the lecture hall at the Pennington Medical Education Building. Shuttles will leave the south end of DMS Building at 11:30 PM and return by 1:30 PM. Paid parking is also available northeast of the Pennington Medical Education Building.

Richard H. Jahns Distinguished Lectureship: “The Richard H. Jahns Distinguished Lectureship was established in 1988 by the Environmental and Engineering Geology Division and the Association of Engineering Geologists, jointly, to commemorate him and to promote student awareness of engineering geology through a series of annual lectures at academic institutions.”

https://community.geosociety.org/eegdivision/awards/jahns

AEG Meeting—Jahns Lecture—Thursday, February 6

Speaker: Scott Lindvall, 2019–2020 AEG/GSA Richard H. Jahns Distinguished Lecturer 2019-2020
Topic: Characterizing Fault Displacement Hazards: Significant Progress and Significant Uncertainties
Abstract: This talk will focus on the different methods and underlying data used to develop probabilistic and deterministic fault displacement estimates as well as our understanding of fault behavior (slip rate, magnitude, and recurrence) and the uncertainties associated with fault behavior and observations of historic fault slip. The presentation will also raise critical questions regarding both methodologies and design criteria used for infrastructure projects in light of these uncertainties.
Biography: Scott Lindvall is a Certified Engineering Geologist in California with 35 years of experience working in the consulting industry performing seismic and geologic hazard analyses, fault investigations, and engineering geology studies for both existing and proposed critical facilities. Full bio.

Richard H. Jahns Distinguished Lectureship:The Richard H. Jahns Distinguished Lectureship was established in 1988 by the Environmental and Engineering Geology Division and the Association of Engineering Geologists, jointly, to commemorate him and to promote student awareness of engineering geology through a series of annual lectures at academic institutions.”

LOCATION: SURESTAY PLUS HOTEL BY BEST WESTERN, 1981 TERMINAL WAY, RENO, NEVADA 89502
SOCIAL HOUR: 5:15PM, DINNER: 6:00PM, PRESENTATION: 7:00PM
COST: Members: $30.00, Non-Members: $32.00, Students: $25.00

RSVP NO LATER THAN 5 PM, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 TO:
Merrily Graham
360-606-1838
mkgraham75@gmail.com
Social Hour Sponsored by Doug and Merrily Graham.

Currently seeking a sponsor for student dinners! AEG can provide an itemized receipt for student dinner sponsorship. Email an AEG officer if you or your company is interested.

The Bar is sponsored, and we are providing complimentary dinners to the first three students who submit RSVP’s. Any additional students will be charged $25.

The monthly chapter meetings are held on the 2nd or 3rd Thursdays of every month, unless notified otherwise.

AEG Meeting—Thursday, January 9, 2020

AEG Logo

SPEAKER: Jesse Ruzicka
TOPIC: Geologic Challenges of the Boulder City Bypass

Abstract: The Boulder City Bypass, also known as I-11, is the first new interstate to be successfully constructed within the US since the 1970’s.  The 12.5 mile long stretch of Phase II begins at US95 and skirts to the south of Boulder City, through the El Dorado Mountains and terminates near Goldstrike Canyon just east of the Hoover Dam Lodge.  Now open to traffic, it relieves much of the traffic congestion that was once commonplace through Boulder City.  The project included 11 bridges, over 100 culverts, a wildlife overcrossing, and a scenic overlook more than 1,000 feet above Lake Mead. A portion of the project was constructed through the El Dorado Mountains and the Lake Mead National Recreation Area under the jurisdiction of the U.S. National Park Service.

This presentation will focus on the geologic challenges encountered during construction of the interstate through the El Dorado Mountains.  Such challenges as numerous rock cut slopes up to 280 feet in height, controlled blasting, rockfall containment, rock slide mitigation, rock bolting, highly variable geologic conditions, and unforgiving steep terrain.

Biography: Mr. Jesse Ruzicka graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno in 2003 with a Bachelor’s degree in Geological Engineering. Since that time, he has been involved in numerous projects providing geotechnical design and support for residential developments, flood control projects in Sacramento and Reno, commercial/industrial developments, roadway and bridge design, and mining projects in Nevada, California, Canada, and Mexico.

He has been involved in many high profile transportation projects in the states of Texas and Nevada including such projects as Phase II of the Boulder City Bypass, the US395 North Valleys project, the I-15/US93 Garnet Interchange, the SR28 Shared Use Path at Lake Tahoe, SH183 Managed Toll Lanes in Dallas, and the Harbor Bridge in Corpus Christi.

Jesse has been involved with AEG since 2001, serving as a past secretary of the Great Basin Chapter from 2010 to 2013 and chair from 2014 to 2016.  Since 2016, Jesse has served as an advisor to the chapter.

LOCATION: SURESTAY PLUS HOTEL BY BEST WESTERN, 1981 TERMINAL WAY, RENO, NEVADA 89502
SOCIAL HOUR: 5:15PM, DINNER: 6:00PM, PRESENTATION: 7:00PM
COST: Members: $30.00, Non-Members: $32.00, Students: $25.00

RSVP NO LATER THAN 5 PM, MONDAY, JANUARY 6TH TO:
Merrily Graham
360-606-1838
mkgraham75@gmail.com

Social Hour Sponsored by Doug and Merrily Graham.

The monthly chapter meetings are held on the 2nd or 3rd Thursdays of every month, unless notified otherwise.

AEG Meeting—Thursday, December 5 Holiday Party and Fundraiser

“Please join us for a Holiday Party and Fundraiser.”
Thursday – December 5th, 2019
https://www.aegweb.org/group/GB
Speaker: Dr. Paul White, Ph.D.
Topic: Legacies in Refinement: Archaeological Perspectives on Alaska’s Historic Gold Mills

ABSTRACT: The mining of hard-rock gold tends to go hand in hand with the construction of onsite processing facilities to crush ores to a size suitable for the recovery of valued products. Mills are inherently dynamic structures, with processing circuits often modified over the course of their operating lives to meet changing circumstances at the mine, be it variations in ore bodies, changes in operative scale, or fluctuating company finances. Yet, despite processing mills being a common sight in Alaska’s gold districts, details about historic operations remain sparse. Comparatively few companies systematized paperwork about milling operations or ultimately preserved these records in archives. Some mills were designed without the aid of blueprints, and even the most meticulously designed plants could undergo adjustments and modifications made on the spot. Little is known also about the laboring experience, partly because milling textbooks seldom covered social conditions, and also because mill workers had better things to do with their time than report the drudgery of their jobs for posterity. 

This talk describes results from a multi-year historical and archaeological study of gold milling practice in the Frontier State. Although abandonment, salvage, and vandalism have reduced the visibility of this once common feature on the industrial landscape, dozens of milling structures survive in varying states of preservation. The archaeological portion of the project documented several mill buildings using hand methods, and with field drawings forming the basis for developing illustrations of each facility in its prime, depicting mills at their maximum developmental extent, righting walls that had collapsed, and setting equipment back in place. Archival research complemented this physical documentation by revealing networks through which technological knowledge was conveyed, the daily routines that millworkers developed to operate equipment, and the human costs of milling as revealed through the analysis of accident records. All told, this project provides a detailed look into the technological and social history of ore processing, highlighting ways that industry practice became adapted to the Alaskan frontier, as well as the differences between textbook descriptions of milling practice and what was always left for people to learn on the job.

BIO: Paul White is an Associate Professor of Geography, and recent hire at the University of Nevada, Reno, with two decades of experience in the archaeological documentation of mining sites in North America. A New Zealander by birth, he came to the United States in 1996 to pursue graduate study in industrial heritage, and stayed, earning a MS in Social Science at Michigan Technological University and a doctorate in Anthropology at Brown University. His research interests have centered upon the social, technological, and environmental transformations associated with mining, examining sites in California and the Great Basin, Alaska, Arkansas, Michigan, and Vermont. This work has involved collaboration with mining companies as well as several governmental agencies, including the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, US Forest Service, US Army Corps of Engineers, US Air Force, and the Environmental Protection Agency. He has worked as a cultural resource consultant during a Superfund cleanup and served as an expert witness in the prosecution of a federal Archaeological Resource Protection Act case. Prior to joining the UNR faculty, he taught for 10 years in the Anthropology department at the University of Alaska Anchorage. His recent book, The Archaeology of American Mining (2017), which synthesizes 50 years of archaeological scholarship, received the 2019 Mining History Association’s Clark Spence Award.

LOCATION: SURE STAY PLUS HOTEL BY BEST WESTERN, 1981 TERMINAL WAY, RENO, NEVADA 89502
SOCIAL HOUR: 5:15 PM; DINNER: 6:00 PM; PRESENTATION: 7:00 PM
COST: Members: $30.00; Non-Members: $32.00; Students: $25.00

The Bar is sponsored, and we are providing complimentary dinners to the first three students who submit RSVPs. Any additional students will be charged $25.

We have some very generous supporters. These are the sponsors for the December meeting:

  • Geotechnical & Environmental Services, Inc.
  • Axion Geotechnical, LLC
  • Diane Phillips Ferree and Wayne Ferree
  • Social Hour sponsored by Doug and Merrily Graham

This month’s meal will be a Special Prime Rib Holiday Dinner with house salad, rolls, vegetables and pecan pie for dessert. On the RSVP, please indicate if you have a dietary restriction such as a non-beef, vegetarian or gluten free options.

RSVP TO MERRILY GRAHAM NO LATER THAN 5 PM, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3: mkgraham75@gmail.com

AEG Monthly Meeting—Thursday, November 7

Chad W. Carlson, Ph.D.

Oroville Dam Emergency Response: Geologic Considerations for Spillway Repairs and the Engineering Geologists’ Contributions during Construction

Abstract: At 770 feet (235 m) high, Oroville Dam is the tallest dam in the U.S. An earthfill-embankment dam on the Feather River just east of the city of Oroville, California, Oroville Dam serves mainly for water supply, hydroelectricity generation, and flood control. The catastrophic failure of the Oroville Dam main spillway during use forced dam operations to stop release of reservoir waters to minimize damage. The subsequent rise in reservoir levels brought into use the emergency (auxiliary) spillway for the first time since dam completion in 1968. The rapid headward erosion across the native landscape toward the crest of the emergency spillway, and its potential for an uncontrolled release of flood waters, was the deciding factor to the downstream evacuation of nearly 200,000 residents on February 12th, 2017. Two and a half years later, with temporary and permanent repairs in place during the runoff seasons of 2018 and 2019, respectively, the majority of work at Oroville Dam is now complete and public access across the dam and spillways to the boat ramp has been restored.

Construction on or into competent rock was a primary consideration during repairs and new construction of Oroville Dam spillways. While the high strength (~50,000 psi) of metamorphic rock (amphibolite) provided sound foundation, localized zones of deeply-weathered bedrock were present across the site. The original construction of main spillway infrastructure on severely weathered bedrock in some places was determined to be the principal contributing factor to its failure. These weathered zones are commonly associated to regional deformation (e.g., foliation and periods of subsequent faulting/shearing). Detailed geologic mapping, exploratory drilling, and geophysical methods were used to assess rock characteristics prior to construction.

During construction, engineering geologists monitored drilling of Main Spillway anchors into bedrock, Secant Pile Wall installation at the downstream end of the Emergency Spillway, slope stability, and numerous other tasks onsite. The in-field engineering geologists’ real-time observations during construction verified spillway design specification were met and aided in the rapid completion of Oroville Dam repairs.

Biography: After 13 years working in Naval and commercial aviation, I found myself with an opportunity to change the direction of my professional life. Being a Fresno native, I returned home in 2005 and registered for courses at Fresno City College. Not long after, I chose to enter studies focused in the Geological Sciences. Having completed much of my lower division requirements, I transferred into the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department at Fresno State the fall of 2007. Working with Dr. John Wakabayashi, I completed a senior thesis interpreting the late Cenozoic uplift history of the central Sierra Nevada and graduated in 2009 with my undergraduate degree in Geology. My earlier goals of going into industry and applied geology were thwarted with my new found passion for geologic research. The fall of the same year I re-entered Fresno State to begin a Master of Science degree working with Dr. Christopher Pluhar. Using paleomagnetics of volcanic rocks I studied the vertical-axis rotations of crust east of the Sierra Nevada in the west-central Walker Lane. As my master’s work was drawing to an end, I considered my options and decided to try applying to a doctorate program. After acceptance to the University of Nevada, Reno, and while still writing my Master’s thesis, I began working with Dr. James Faulds in fall of 2011 to further the understanding of dextral shear accommodation and strain transfer at the transition between the northern and central Walker Lane. While juggling a teaching assistantship and coursework the first year in Reno, I managed to complete my Master’s in Geology the spring of 2012 at Fresno State. Combining detailed geologic mapping and paleomagnetic research, I finished my Ph.D. in Geology the summer of 2017. With little time to relish my accomplishment, I soon found myself full circle back to applied geology working on the spillway repairs of the Oroville Dam as an independent geologic consultant for InfraTerra, Inc. With my experiences from Oroville, and a new position with Lettis Consultants International, Inc., I look forward to becoming a licensed Professional Geologist while continuing my research endeavors to expand my knowledge base in all aspects of geology.

Chad W. Carlson, Lettis Consultants International, Inc. (InfraTerra, Inc.) carlson@nevada.unr .edu

LOCATION: SURE STAY PLUS HOTEL BY BEST WESTERN
1981 TERMINAL WAY
RENO, NEVADA 89502

SOCIAL HOUR: 5:15PM
DINNER: 6:00PM
PRESENTATION: 7:00PM

RSVP NO LATER THAN 5PM, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 to Merrily Graham: mkgraham75@gmail.com

Please give us a 48 Hour Cancellation Notice if you are not able to attend. “No shows” without proper notification will be charged. You will be responsible for your invited guests who do not comply with the cancellation request.  Thank you.

AEG Monthly Meeting—Thursday, November 7

Chad W. Carlson, Ph.D.

Oroville Dam Emergency Response: Geologic Considerations for Spillway Repairs and the Engineering Geologists’ Contributions during Construction

Abstract: At 770 feet (235 m) high, Oroville Dam is the tallest dam in the U.S. An earthfill-embankment dam on the Feather River just east of the city of Oroville, California, Oroville Dam serves mainly for water supply, hydroelectricity generation, and flood control. The catastrophic failure of the Oroville Dam main spillway during use forced dam operations to stop release of reservoir waters to minimize damage. The subsequent rise in reservoir levels brought into use the emergency (auxiliary) spillway for the first time since dam completion in 1968. The rapid headward erosion across the native landscape toward the crest of the emergency spillway, and its potential for an uncontrolled release of flood waters, was the deciding factor to the downstream evacuation of nearly 200,000 residents on February 12th, 2017. Two and a half years later, with temporary and permanent repairs in place during the runoff seasons of 2018 and 2019, respectively, the majority of work at Oroville Dam is now complete and public access across the dam and spillways to the boat ramp has been restored.

Construction on or into competent rock was a primary consideration during repairs and new construction of Oroville Dam spillways. While the high strength (~50,000 psi) of metamorphic rock (amphibolite) provided sound foundation, localized zones of deeply-weathered bedrock were present across the site. The original construction of main spillway infrastructure on severely weathered bedrock in some places was determined to be the principal contributing factor to its failure. These weathered zones are commonly associated to regional deformation (e.g., foliation and periods of subsequent faulting/shearing). Detailed geologic mapping, exploratory drilling, and geophysical methods were used to assess rock characteristics prior to construction.

During construction, engineering geologists monitored drilling of Main Spillway anchors into bedrock, Secant Pile Wall installation at the downstream end of the Emergency Spillway, slope stability, and numerous other tasks onsite. The in-field engineering geologists’ real-time observations during construction verified spillway design specification were met and aided in the rapid completion of Oroville Dam repairs.

Biography: After 13 years working in Naval and commercial aviation, I found myself with an opportunity to change the direction of my professional life. Being a Fresno native, I returned home in 2005 and registered for courses at Fresno City College. Not long after, I chose to enter studies focused in the Geological Sciences. Having completed much of my lower division requirements, I transferred into the Earth and Environmental Sciences Department at Fresno State the fall of 2007. Working with Dr. John Wakabayashi, I completed a senior thesis interpreting the late Cenozoic uplift history of the central Sierra Nevada and graduated in 2009 with my undergraduate degree in Geology. My earlier goals of going into industry and applied geology were thwarted with my new found passion for geologic research. The fall of the same year I re-entered Fresno State to begin a Master of Science degree working with Dr. Christopher Pluhar. Using paleomagnetics of volcanic rocks I studied the vertical-axis rotations of crust east of the Sierra Nevada in the west-central Walker Lane. As my master’s work was drawing to an end, I considered my options and decided to try applying to a doctorate program. After acceptance to the University of Nevada, Reno, and while still writing my Master’s thesis, I began working with Dr. James Faulds in fall of 2011 to further the understanding of dextral shear accommodation and strain transfer at the transition between the northern and central Walker Lane. While juggling a teaching assistantship and coursework the first year in Reno, I managed to complete my Master’s in Geology the spring of 2012 at Fresno State. Combining detailed geologic mapping and paleomagnetic research, I finished my Ph.D. in Geology the summer of 2017. With little time to relish my accomplishment, I soon found myself full circle back to applied geology working on the spillway repairs of the Oroville Dam as an independent geologic consultant for InfraTerra, Inc. With my experiences from Oroville, and a new position with Lettis Consultants International, Inc., I look forward to becoming a licensed Professional Geologist while continuing my research endeavors to expand my knowledge base in all aspects of geology.

Chad W. Carlson, Lettis Consultants International, Inc. (InfraTerra, Inc.) carlson@nevada.unr .edu

LOCATION: SURE STAY PLUS HOTEL BY BEST WESTERN
1981 TERMINAL WAY
RENO, NEVADA 89502

SOCIAL HOUR: 5:15PM
DINNER: 6:00PM
PRESENTATION: 7:00PM

RSVP NO LATER THAN 5PM, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 to Merrily Graham: mkgraham75@gmail.com

Please give us a 48 Hour Cancellation Notice if you are not able to attend. “No shows” without proper notification will be charged. You will be responsible for your invited guests who do not comply with the cancellation request.  Thank you.