Archive | July 2019

Job Announcements from BLM

A message from BLM: We are pleased to announce new, exciting positions available at BLM – BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT.   It is our hope that qualified, career oriented individuals at your organization or other professionals known to you will actively consider this position and apply accordingly.  Efforts on your part to disseminate this information are greatly appreciated.

Job Description:  Geologist (Geothermal);
Announcement Number:  CA-Merit-2019-0109;
Location(s) of position:  Sacramento, CA, US;
Salary:  (USD) $80,993 – (USD) $125,202;
Applications will be accepted until:  07/17/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please go to: https://jobs.monstergovt.com/blm/vacancy/viewVacancyDetail!execute.hms?orgId=3&jnum=123447

Job Description:  Student Trainee (Administrative);
Announcement Number:  CA-PTHWYS-2019-0004;
Location(s) of position:  Sacramento, CA, US;
Salary:  (USD) $32,946 – (USD) $42,825;
Applications will be accepted until:  07/26/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please go to: https://jobs.monstergovt.com/blm/vacancy/viewVacancyDetail!execute.hms?orgId=3&jnum=122727

Job Description:  Natural Resources Specialist (DHA-STEM);
Announcement Number:  NM-DEU-2019-0087;
Location(s) of position:  Santa Fe, NM, US;
Salary:  (USD) $72,637 – (USD) $94,434;
Applications will be accepted until:  07/25/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please go to: https://jobs.monstergovt.com/blm/vacancy/viewVacancyDetail!execute.hms?orgId=3&jnum=123790

Job Description:  Natural Resource Specialist/ Physical Scientist (Air Quality Specialist);
Announcement Number:  CA-DEU-2019-0038;
Location(s) of position:  Sacramento, CA, US;
Salary:  (USD) $96,311 – (USD) $125,202;
Applications will be accepted until:  07/22/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please go to: https://jobs.monstergovt.com/blm/vacancy/viewVacancyDetail!execute.hms?orgId=3&jnum=123763 

Job Description:  Natural Resource Specialist/ Physical Scientist (Air Quality Specialist);
Announcement Number:  CA-Merit-2019-0126;
Location(s) of position:  Sacramento, CA, US;
Salary:  (USD) $96,311 – (USD) $125,202;
Applications will be accepted until:  07/22/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please go to: https://jobs.monstergovt.com/blm/vacancy/viewVacancyDetail!execute.hms?orgId=3&jnum=123723 

Job Description:  Natural Resources Specialist;
Announcement Number:  MT-DEU-2019-0053;
Location(s) of position:  Dickinson, ND, US;
Salary:  (USD) $72,637 – (USD) $94,434;
Applications will be accepted until:  07/16/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please go to: https://jobs.monstergovt.com/blm/vacancy/viewVacancyDetail!execute.hms?orgId=3&jnum=123732 

Job Description:  Administrative Officer;
Announcement Number:  NM Merit-2019-0092;
Location(s) of position:  Taos, NM, US;
Salary:  (USD) $62,236 – (USD) $80,912;
Applications will be accepted until:  07/15/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please go to: https://jobs.monstergovt.com/blm/vacancy/viewVacancyDetail!execute.hms?orgId=3&jnum=123501 

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1954 Earthquakes in Fallon Area—More Reminders that Nevada is Earthquake Country

A series of earthquakes as recent as 1954 occurred in the Fallon area. These were similar in size to the earthquakes this month near Ridgecrest, California and serve as a reminder that Nevadans do live in earthquake country.

The text below includes excerpts from this publication:
Damaging Earthquakes in Nevada: 1840s to 2008, by Craig M. dePolo
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Damaging-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp037.htm

The damaging earthquakes briefly described on this map occurred during the period from the mid-1800s to 2008. They are the largest historical examples, but do not include all significant and damaging earthquake events in the state. These events and their descriptions remind us that Nevada is earthquake country and that earthquakes will produce strong shaking within our communities in the future. A wise course of action for Nevadans is to heed the lessons of past events, know how to react to an earthquake, and actively prepare for earthquakes. Many ideas to stay safe and protect your property from earthquakes can be found in Living with Earthquakes in Nevada on the web at www.nbmg.unr.edu (NBMG Special Publication 27).
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Living-with-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp027.htm

1954, July 6
Rainbow Mountain Earthquakes
M 6.2 and M 6.1
On July 6, 1954 at 3:13 a.m. PST an earthquake of “major proportions” struck near the town of Fallon. The magnitude 6.2 event (Pancha and others, 2006) was felt from San Francisco to Wendover and from southern Oregon to just north of Las Vegas (Cloud, 1956). Eight men were injured, one with a fractured leg, at the Fallon Naval Air Station when barracks lockers fell on them while they were sleeping in their bunks (FS 7/7/54). More than a dozen buildings and businesses were damaged in Fallon (FS 7/7/54; FS 8/11/54). Damage was most severe to brick and concrete buildings and included cracked and fallen walls and plaster. Many chimneys fell or were damaged. A dam broke, and there was extensive damage to the Newlands Project irrigation system (FS 7/7/54). President Eisenhower declared the Fallon region a disaster area and made available $200,000 of disaster relief funding (FS 7 /14/54). Earthquake surface rupturing from the July 6th event was more than 18 km (11 mi) long, and the ground was vertically offset by as much as 35 cm (-14 in; Tocher, 1956; Caskey and others, 2004). Extensive liquefaction occurred, accompanied by water spouts, ground settling, and the filling of irrigation canals with sediment (Steinbrugge and Moran, 1956). A magnitude 6.1 aftershock occurred on the afternoon of July 6, only 11 hours after the mainshock and extended the surface ruptures to the south (Caskey and others, 2004).

1954, August 23
Stillwater Earthquake
M 6.8
The Stillwater earthquake struck the Fallon region on August 23, 1954 at 10:51 p.m. PST and was estimated to have been magnitude 6.8 (Pancha and others (2006). It created 53 km (33 mi) of surface faulting (Caskey and others, 2004). This was a right-lateral strike-slip earthquake with some normal offset, and the largest surface rupture had about 1 m (-3 ft) of right-lateral strike-slip offset (Caskey and others, 2004). In Fallon, seven buildings were damaged (FS 8/25/54; FS 9/1/54). Of these buildings, three, including a school building, were so severely damaged they had to be torn down. Chimneys were thrown down or cracked, windows were broken, and there was a lot of nonstructural damage (FS 8/25/54). A four-inch water main was broken in two places (FS 8/25/54). Again there was extensive liquefaction in the Fallon area (Murphy and Cloud, 1956). Unfortunately, a large part of the emergency remediation work conducted on the canal system was completely obliterated by the Stillwater earthquake (Murphy and Cloud, 1956).

1954, December 16
Fairview Peak–Dixie Valley Earthquakes
M 7.1 and M 6.9
On December 16, 1954 there were two large, back-to-back earthquakes east of the Fallon area that were felt throughout Nevada and created several large ground ruptures. The first event, the Fairview Peak earthquake, a right-normal-oblique-slip event, occurred at 3:07 a.m. PST and had a magnitude of 7.1 (Pancha and others, 2006). This was followed four minutes and 20 seconds later (3:11 a.m.) by a magnitude 6.9 event, the Dixie Valley earthquake, a normal-slip event (Slemmons and others, 1965). Both earthquakes created spectacular surface ruptures over a total area of 100 km (62 mi) long and 14.5 km (9 mi) wide, with ground offsets of as much as 3.8 m (12.5 ft) vertical and 2.9 m (9.5 ft) right lateral (Slemmons, 1957; Caskey and others, 1996). The earthquake was in a sparsely populated region, and there were no reported injuries and only minor building damage and content losses. In Dixie Valley, an “adobe cellar, gasoline tank and water tank, and stone wall collapsed”, a stove moved several feet, and a woman was thrown from her bed due to the shaking (Murphy and Cloud, 1956). In one living room, a piano “kangarooed” its way to the opposite side of the room during the shaking (FS 12/22/54). In the surrounding region, dishes broke, walls and chimneys were cracked in the towns of Austin, Luning, Mina, Rawhide, Fallon, Lovelock, Eureka, and Carson City (Murphy and Cloud, 1956). Damage in Carson City included cracked walls and fallen plaster in the Capitol building, the State Printing Building, and the State Prison (Murphy and Cloud, 1956). Water lines were broken at Lovelock, Mina and near Gabbs (Murphy and Cloud, 1956).

Nevada Today Story: Earthquake Reminder

Sequence of 60 earthquakes in Sun Valley, and Washoe Valley earthquake gentle reminders Nevada is seismically active state.

College of Science leads effort to monitor, research, assess earthquake hazards.

By Mike Wolterbeek (Nevada Today, 6/19/2019)

Read story here (and copied below):
https://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2019/earthquakes-in-nevada

An ongoing sequence of more than 60 small earthquakes that began in the early morning hours today is centered in the Sun Valley area – they are too small to be felt. But, more than 1,200 people filed “felt reports” following the magnitude 3.7 earthquake in Washoe Valley the night of June 6. The shaking is a gentle reminder that Nevadans live in the third most seismically active state in the nation, behind Alaska and California.

The Nevada Seismological Lab and the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology in the College of Science lead the initiative of monitoring, mapping, researching and assessing earthquake hazards throughout the state. They also lead the charge about earthquake preparedness.

“These sequences like we are seeing in Sun Valley can either subside or escalate, we’ve seen it happen both ways in Nevada,” Graham Kent, geophysicist and director of the Nevada Seismological Lab, said. “These are common in Nevada, once in a while we’ve seen them culminate in magnitude 4 and higher earthquakes. It pays to be prepared.”

There has been this type of activity in the Sun Valley area before, and while it’s likely to not result in a large earthquake, sometimes they do, he said. The Washoe Valley sequence June 6 was short and abrupt, ending in the 3.7 earthquake.

Nevada has dozens of identified earthquake fault systems. The state even shares some faults, and is interconnected, with some California fault systems. And the fault systems haven’t been moving as much as expected when looking back at the history of earthquakes in the last 100 years.

Nevada earthquake hazard similar to California
“Our urban area in western Nevada has a hazard approaching the level that is seen near the most active faults in California,” said John Anderson, a University of Nevada, Reno professor and lead author of a new paper, which is an outcome of the two-day workshop describing earthquake hazard in Nevada. “We hope that this perspective will encourage residents of our area to undertake sensible actions to be prepared for earthquakes.”

In their work to help keep people prepared, and to better understand seismic hazards in Nevada, the Seismo Lab and the Bureau of Mines and Geology brought together 40 geophysicists, geologists, and engineers – earthquake and ground motion experts – in a two-day workshop to assess the earthquake hazards in the two largest urban areas of Nevada. The workshop was to review ongoing earthquake hazard research in Nevada, discuss technical issues related to Nevada earthquake hazards and identify priorities for future research that will reduce uncertainties and improve the USGS National Seismic Hazard Model. The workshop included contributions from a wide range of earthquake professionals from government, academia and industry.

“The reality is that we hold these workshops to better understand sequences like this, to find a path of understanding of the likelihood of whether they go larger or not,” Kent said.

The urban areas of western Nevada have the highest seismic hazard in the state. The Las Vegas Valley has a lower seismic hazard than northern Nevada, but there are higher uncertainties as to hazard level. An expanded geodetic network and continued geological studies of the active faults are needed.

The more distant Garlock and Death Valley and even the San Andreas faults in eastern California impact the hazard in Las Vegas, because the Las Vegas basin amplifies long-period ground motion and prolongs its duration. The report emphasizes that it is very important to better understand the important faults in southern Nevada, including hard to interpret faults that run through the heart of the city.

A quiet 60 years of seismic activity
The most recent 60 years have been quieter than earlier times. All 13 of Nevada’s historical earthquakes with magnitude 6.5 or greater occurred in the 102-year period ending in 1954. Of the 44 known earthquakes with magnitude 6.0 or greater, only five have occurred since 1960, while 15 would be more consistent with the prior historical rate.

The summary of the workshop comments that there is some reason to believe that the pre-1960 earthquake rates are more typical of what we should expect in the future.

“Nevada is, as we know, growing, and thus the most important places in the state to be sure that we get the National Seismic Hazard Model right are the growing urban areas,” Anderson said. “For that reason, Rich Koehler (a geosciences assistant professor in the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology) and I took the lead in organizing the workshop to discuss what is known and, what are the most important things that we do not know. We expect that the results of the workshop will guide researchers to try to solve the most important problems in the next few years.”

At the two-day workshop in 2018, dozens of geophysicists presented the latest information and research to update the seismic hazard maps for Nevada and eastern California. The workshop was a collaborative effort by the Nevada Seismological Lab, the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology and others.

Their paper, “A seismic hazards overview of the urban regions of Nevada: Recent advancements and research directions” was published June 5 online in the scientific journal Seismological Research Letters. A companion Open-File Report published earlier this year by the Bureau of Mines and Geology summarizes the research presentations and recommendations from the workshop.

The 24 authors – geoscientists who specialize in geodesy, seismology, seismic network observations and seismic studies of earthquake ground motion – all provide information to the USGS for the National Seismic Hazard Model. Periodic updates of the National Seismic Hazard Model are subsequently adopted by the engineering community to set the design of buildings in this region, and throughout the nation.

“This information is valuable as we plan and expand our statewide seismic monitoring system,” Seismo Lab Director Kent said.

The National Seismic Hazard Model is developed by the USGS as a community product through collaboration with researchers and engineers throughout the country. For Nevada and some of the adjacent parts of California, the University of Nevada, Reno provides key contributions to be sure that the NSHM is based on the best possible science.

The University has excellent programs that contribute to all of these research and outreach areas, specifically the Nevada Seismological Lab, the Bureau of Mines and Geology and the Nevada Geodetic Laboratory – all public service departments in the College of Science. This work is a part of the ongoing efforts of the Nevada Seismological Laboratory and Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology to understand the seismic hazards of the state.

Earthquake preparedness information can be found on the Great Nevada Shakeout website and the Nevada Seismological Laboratory website.

Planning Scenario for a Major Earthquake in Western Nevada

Now Available Free Online

This NBMG Special Publication by Craig M. dePolo, Jim G. Rigby, Gary L. Johnson, Steven L. Jacobson, John G. Anderson, and Thomas J. Wythes is now available free online:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Planning-scenario-for-major-EQ-p/sp020.htm

This publication provides a detailed analysis of the plausible consequences of a hypothetical magnitude 7.1 earthquake along the northern Carson Range front in the Reno–Carson City area.

It’s a Smart Time for Fellow Nevadans to Get Earthquake Ready

By Craig M. dePolo (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology)

Earthquakes are all about consequences, as the chance of a damaging one occurring is fortunately low (although upwards of 14,000 small earthquakes occur in Nevada every year). But the consequences, especially those that could have been prevented, are commonly unacceptable. The low chance of an event makes it easy to delay getting prepared with all the other pressing issues in life. But Nevada is earthquake country and damaging earthquakes will occur in the future. With the magnitude 6.4 and 7.1 earthquakes occurring not far from the Nevada border, it is a great time to finally get earthquake ready. Here is what we recommend:

1) Personal safety: Know what to do when strong shaking occurs.  DROP, COVER, and HOLD.  Can things fall on you when you’re in bed? If so remove these items or secure them. Identify a safe spot in each room where you can take cover to protect yourself from falling objects. Don’t forget to check your office as well.

2) Protect valuable items: The contents in our homes and offices can be tossed around during an earthquake and heavy or sharp objects are a common cause of injuries. Shaking hazards can be moved to a safer location, secured in place, replaced with a lighter item, or removed altogether. Some special consideration should also be given to items that are of value to you, such as family heirlooms, to protect them.

3) Prepare a disaster kit: This includes water, food, safety supplies, medications, pet food and other supplies to sustain you and your family for at least five days.

4) Prepare a disaster plan: Taking the time to put together a short plan helps a family reunite following a damaging earthquake and focuses attention on possible hazards around your house (such as telling children to stay away from a tall chimney). Discuss this plan with your family. Businesses should have disaster plans too.  

5) Check your house for earthquake weaknesses and begin to fix them: This step is the hardest and you may need some assistance, but protecting the investment of your home and having a place to shelter following an earthquake makes it worthwhile. Is your house bolted to the foundation?

These and other recommendations and further earthquake discussions can be found in Living with Earthquakes in Nevada at this link (open the link below and then click on the PDF link under Free Downloads):

http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Living-with-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp027.htm Future damaging earthquakes will occur in Nevada, and we want Nevadans to survive them well.

Job Announcements from BLM

A message from BLM: We are pleased to announce new, exciting positions available at BLM – BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT. It is our hope that qualified, career oriented individuals at your organization or other professionals known to you will actively consider this position and apply accordingly. Efforts on your part to disseminate this information are greatly appreciated.

Job Description: Resource Advisor;
Announcement Number: CA-Merit-2019-0119;
Location(s) of position: Sacramento, CA, US;
Salary: (USD) $96,311 – (USD) $125,202;
Applications will be accepted until: 07/07/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Job Description: Physical Scientist;
Announcement Number: CO-DEU-2019-0029;
Location(s) of position: Silt, CO, US;
Salary: (USD) $51,440 – (USD) $80,912;
Applications will be accepted until: 07/04/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Job Description: Biological Science Technician (Wildlife);
Announcement Number: NM-DEU-2019-0080;
Location(s) of position: Albuquerque, NM, US;
Salary: (USD) $34,105 – (USD) $34,105;
Applications will be accepted until: 07/05/2019.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

KTVN Face the State—Geothermal Energy in Nevada

Arianna Bennett interviews Jim Faulds:
https://www.ktvn.com/clip/14834377/face-the-state-geothermal-energy-in-nevada

In this interview, Jim Faulds, NBMG Director and State Geologist, explains to the public how geothermal energy works, why Nevada geology is favorable for geothermal, its advantages as a renewable resource, and its future.