Anniversaries of two M 6.0 earthquakes in northern Nevada

Last week there were anniversaries of two M 6.0 earthquakes in northern Nevada:
Reno area—February 18, 1914
Wells area—February 21, 2008

Historical Reno Earthquakes (M 6.0 and M 6.4), February 18 and April 24, 1914

“A pair of earthquakes strongly shook Reno in 1914 and caused light damage to the city. The first earthquake was about magnitude 6 and occurred on February 18th at 10:17 a.m. PST. Shaking in Reno, Sparks, and Virginia City was so strong that people rushed to the streets fearing buildings were going to collapse (dePolo and Garside, 2006). The earthquake lasted for about 10 seconds and broke windows, cracked walls, and sent some parts of a brick firewall crashing to the ground in Reno (Reno Evening Gazette, 2/18/1914). The shaking cracked plaster and tossed contents on floors. The earthquake also cracked windows and caused bricks to fall as far away as Virginia City (Daily Territorial Enterprise, 2/19/1914).

A second, larger (~M 6.4) earthquake struck Reno on April 24th at 12:34 a.m. PST. This earthquake was stronger than the February event in nearly every aspect, and again people ran out of buildings in Reno. People were awakened from their sleep as far away as the Sacramento Valley in California from the shaking. In Reno, bricks fell from buildings, plaster was cracked, windows were cracked, and dishes were broken (REG 4/24/1914). Four chimneys were damaged up on University Hill (Reno Evening Gazette, 4/24/1914). In Virginia City, people who were awake dashed to the streets, as pictures were jarred from walls and dishes fell from shelves (Daily Territorial Enterprise, 4/24/1914).”

Excerpt from Damaging Earthquakes in Nevada: 1840s to 2008, by Craig M. dePolo:
http://pubs.nbmg.unr.edu/Damaging-earthquakes-in-NV-p/sp037.htm

2008 Wells Earthquake (M 6.0), February 21, 2008

 You can read about the Wells earthquake in this publication edited by Craig M. dePolo and Daphne D. LaPointe:
The 21 February 2008 Mw 6.0 Wells, Nevada Earthquake: A Compendium of Earthquake-Related Investigations Prepared by the University of Nevada, Reno.

New! Fault and Seismicity Maps for Northern Nevada

QFaultMaps
Six new preliminary 1:250,000-scale maps that show Quaternary faults and seismicity in northern Nevada are now available. The faults presented are slightly modified from those on Quaternary Faults in Nevada (NBMG Map 167) and the USGS Quaternary Fault and Fold Database of the United States and show fault activity by geologic age. The earthquake data set is compiled from a modified earthquake catalog by Slemmons and others (1965) which includes data beginning in the 1840s, earthquakes recorded by the Nevada Seismological Laboratory from 1970 through 2014, and earthquakes recorded by seismic networks in California and Utah. The shaded-relief basemap was created from a 10-meter digital elevation model and is illuminated from the northwest. These preliminary products are an effort to create more informative earthquake hazard maps for decision makers and the public.

Authors: Craig M. dePolo and Seth M. Dee
Year: 2015
Series: Open-File Reports 2015-11A–F
Format: 38 x 33 inches
Scale: 1:250,000

Here is the list of all six maps in this series:
OF2015-11A
Preliminary Quaternary fault and seismicity map of the Vya 1 x 2 degree quadrangle, Nevada

OF2015-11B
Preliminary Quaternary fault and seismicity map of the McDermitt 1 x 2 degree quadrangle, Nevada

OF2015-11C
Preliminary Quaternary fault and seismicity map of the Wells 1 x 2 degree quadrangle, Nevada

OF2015-11D
Preliminary Quaternary fault and seismicity map of the Lovelock 1 x 2 degree quadrangle, Nevada

OF2015-11E
Preliminary Quaternary fault and seismicity map of the Winnemucca 1 x 2 degree quadrangle, Nevada

OF2015-11F
Preliminary Quaternary fault and seismicity map of the Elko 1 x 2 degree quadrangle, Nevada

Click here for an index map of the six 250K quadrangles.

DGSE Lecture— TODAY, Feb 22 at 4:00pm – GPS Imaging of Sierra Nevada Uplift—by Bill Hammond

GPS Imaging of Sierra Nevada Uplift—by Bill Hammond

A message from Dr. Scott McCoy, Department of Geological Sciences and Engineering (DGSE):

Today, from 4-5 PM in DMS 102, Dr. Bill Hammond from the NBMG will give a talk titled GPS Imaging of Sierra Nevada Uplift. I hope to see you there!

Job Announcements from BLM

blm-logo
We are pleased to announce new, exciting positions available at BLM – BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT.   It is our hope that qualified, career oriented individuals at your organization or other professionals known to you will actively consider this position and apply accordingly.  Efforts on your part to disseminate this information are greatly appreciated.

Position Information:
Job Description:  Engineering Technician (Petroleum);
Announcement Number:  MT-DEU-2016-0036;
Location(s) of position:  Great Falls, MT, US;
Salary:  $35,328 – $62,999;
Applications will be accepted until:  02/18/2016.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Position Information:
Job Description:  Interdisciplinary (RMS/NRS/Botany);
Announcement Number:  OR-DEU-2016-0050;
Location(s) of position:  Lakeview, OR, US;
Salary:  $48,968 – $77,019;
Applications will be accepted until:  02/18/2016.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Position Information:
Job Description:  Interdisciplinary (Civil Engineer/Forester);
Announcement Number:  OR-DEU-2016-0061;
Location(s) of position:  Tillamook, OR, US;
Salary:  $59,246 – $77,019;
Applications will be accepted until:  02/12/2016.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Position Information:
Job Description:  Supervisory Range Technician (Fire) (Supervisory Wildland Firefighter);
Announcement Number:  OR-DEU-2016-0060;
Location(s) of position:  Vale, OR, US;
Salary:  $36,025 – $52,043;
Applications will be accepted until:  02/12/2016.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Position Information:
Job Description:  Educational Technician;
Announcement Number:  OR-DEU-2016-0059;|
Location(s) of position:  Medford, OR, US;
Salary:  $32,318 – $42,012;
Applications will be accepted until:  02/05/2016.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Position Information:
Job Description:  Supervisory Forestry Technician (Fire) (Supervisory Wildland Firefighter);
Announcement Number:  OR-DEU-2016-0062;
Location(s) of position:  Lakeview, OR, US;
Salary:  $36,025 – $52,043;
Applications will be accepted until:  02/18/2016.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Position Information: (previously emailed—deadline tomorrow!)
Job Description:  Geologist;
Announcement Number:  NV-DEU-2016-0050;
Location(s) of position:  Las Vegas, NV, US;
Salary:  $49,054 – $77,154;
Applications will be accepted until:  02/05/2016.
For additional information on this job posting, please click here.

Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists Meeting Announcement

AEG_Logo_Revised-9-28-05_0
Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists
Great Basin Section (AEG)
Meeting Announcement
Thursday, February 18, 2016

SPEAKER: Dr. John N. Louie

Topic: Deep ReMi Imaging – Mapping Shear-Wave Velocities to 1 km Depth and Greater in Reno/Tahoe Using Refraction Microtremor
Satish Pullammanappallil (Optim, Reno, NV 89501; satish@optimsoftware.com)
Aasha Pancha (Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand; Aasha.Pancha@vuw.ac.nz)
John Louie (Nevada Seismological Laboratory, UNR, NV 89557; louie@seismo.unr.edu)

LOCATION:
RAPSCALLION SEAFOOD HOUSE & BAR
1555 S. WELLS AVENUE, RENO, NEVADA 89502
SOCIAL HOUR: 5:30 PM, DINNER: 6:30 PM
PRESENTATION: 7:00 PM

RSVP NO LATER THAN 5PM, TUESDAY FEBRUARY 16 BY 5:00
@ 775¬221¬1369 or justin.mcdougal@amecfw.com

Cost: Members: $25.00, non-members: $29.00

Abstract: The Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) technique, which came into use during 2002, has now become a standard tool for assessing shear-wave velocities for engineering applications. It is used for site-class studies as well as assessing ground conditions, including 1D and 2D velocity-depth profiling to shallow depths of approximately 100 m. Over the last few years, we have successfully extended the application of the method to depths greater than 1 km. The use of deep ReMi, which relies primarily on ambient noise, for estimation of shear-wave velocities to kilometer depths, allows for mapping the thickness and velocity of deep basins. The deep shear-wave velocity results in turn can be used for accurate modeling and calibration of recorded earthquake ground motions in the target urban areas. Such models have the potential to be an essential part of seismic hazard evaluation. We present results from several deep ReMi studies conducted in Reno-Tahoe basins. In all cases data were acquired using wireless instruments coupled with low-frequency geophones deployed in 3 km long arrays across the densely populated urban environment. In addition to mapping basement as deep as 900 m, the lateral velocity variations reveal deep-seated fault structure. Characterization of previously unknown faults is vital as well towards quantifying earthquake ground motion and seismic potential. Modeling was constrained using gravity data and earthquake tomography models when available.

Bio: Dr. John N. Louie, Professor at the Nevada Seismological Laboratory, has over twenty-five years of university teaching and research experience in geophysics. He has published with students several well-cited papers on innovations in seismic imaging of earthquake faults in California, Nevada, and New Zealand. Over the last 15 years, Dr. Louie has developed a faster and more efficient site-assessment survey technique for earthquake-hazard evaluation, Refraction Microtremor. Research on this technology continues, measuring thousands of sites in California, Nevada, and New Zealand; and on using geological and geotechnical measurements to predict earthquake shaking from 3D wave physics, and improve communities’ resilience to disasters.

SME Foundation Award: MEC Partnership Award to Daphne D. LaPointe

 

The MEC [Minerals Education Coalition] Partnership Appreciation Award is presented to Daphne D. LaPointe “in recognition of dedication to the students and teachers of Nevada in motivation and education in the earth sciences and the study of geology. Daphne (D.D.) LaPointe received her bachelors degree from Smith College and a masters degree from the University of Montana, both in geology. She first worked in minerals exploration for Exxon Minerals in Idaho and Montana. She has lived in Reno, NV since 1979, where she worked in geology for the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology (NBMG) for 32 years. She was always involved in coordinating education and outreach activities in minerals and mining with local schools, teachers, students and the public. After retirement in 2013, she continued to volunteer in geological education and scholarship activities associated with the Geological Society of Nevada, the Nevada Mining Association and WAAIME. Specific projects she initiated include a field trip grant program funded by the Geological Society of Nevada Foundation to help Nevada K-12 teachers take students on earth-science and mining-related field trips and a field camp grant program to help University of Nevada Reno geology students with costs of required summer field camp. She also helped initiate a series of annual public Earth Science Week field trips at NBMG.” (excerpt from Mining Engineering magazine, January 2016, page 57)

GSA Presidential Address by Jon Price: The World is Changing

 

GSA 2015 PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS

“The world is changing. Our science is increasingly global, as we recognize the challenges of understanding interconnected Earth systems, meeting the rising global demand for mineral and energy resources, handling tradeoffs regarding sustainable development, and reducing the risks of natural disasters that impact the global economy. The geosciences are vital to meeting these societal challenges. The future is bright for the geosciences, from many perspectives.”

You can read the text for the complete address here (GSA Today, January 2016).